Course Content | Leading Edge Safety (2023)

Leading Edge training provides a rich and diverse curriculum of working at height theory of practical exercises. Discover and compare everything you can learn on the various courses we offer.

Course Content | Leading Edge Safety (1)

Practical Exercises

There are many ways to work at height. We cover every technique — basic to advanced. What you learn on the day depends mostly on your personal requirements and your course level. Here is a basic breakdown of the lessons available for eachcourse.

Click a Practical Module to learn more.

  • Practical Modules
  • Basic Awareness
  • Level 1
  • Level 1+
  • Level 2
  • Harness Training

Harness Training

To begin the practical phase of your course we have a quick recap of the harness information learned in the theory section. This ensures everyone has remembered how to fit and adjust their harnesses correctly before setting foot near an edge.

Course Content | Leading Edge Safety (2)

  • Anchorage

Anchorage

Anchorage forms the foundation of your height access system and any mistakes made here makes all subsequent efforts worthless. In phase 2 You'll learn which anchorage devices to use and in which configurations to place based on your work area and theleading edge.

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  • Fall Arrest Systems

Fall Arrest Systems

Fall arrest sytems increase mobility but the trade-off is they allow you to fall. If that happens the blocks lock like a car seat belt and (hence the title) arrest your fall. Because falling is permitted caution is required, so we show you strictrules and practises that enable you to use them safely for work at height.

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  • Single Block

Fall Arrest Systems

Single Block

This system of work will allow users to be able to safety set up and use a fall arrest block system, that is anchored parallel to their working edge at ‘fall factor 2’ (foot level). This will give them access to a 2 meter working area, over one openedge.

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  • Vertical Blocks

Fall Arrest Systems

Vertical Blocks

This system of work will allow users to be able to safety set up and use a fall arrest block that is anchored at the optimum position ‘fall factor 0’ (above their head). This will give them access to a 1 meter working area, over one open edge.

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  • Parallel Blocks

Fall Arrest Systems

Parallel Blocks

This system of work will allow users to work over a wide area, through being able to safely set up and use two fall arrest blocks, that are anchored parallel to their working edge ‘fall factor 2’ (foot level). This will give them access to widerworking area, over one open edge.

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  • Triangulated Blocks

Fall Arrest Systems

Triangulated Blocks

This system of work will allow users to work over two or four leading edges, through being able to safely set up and use two fall arrest blocks that are anchored diagonally across their working area. This will give them access to wider working areas,over two or four open edges.

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  • Restraint Systems

Restraint Systems

Higher up in the height safety hierarchy are Restraint Systems. These systems offer the same level of access as Fall Arrest Blocks but are considered a safer and more desirable method of work since the use of ropes physically 'restrains' yourproximity to an edge. Restraint Systems are extremely versatile, allowing for both front and rear connection in several configurations across horizontal, vertical and pitched planes. Some or all of which you'll discover and practice depending onyour course.

Course Content | Leading Edge Safety (9)

(Video) Fall Protection in Leading Edge Work - Demonstration from Hoffman Const. (M5V3 Decking Work Example)
  • Single Line

Restraint Systems

Single Line

This system of work will allow users to be able to safety set up and stay in restraint when using a single adjustable rope line, anchored parallel to their working edge at ‘fall factor 2’ (foot level). This will give them access to a 2 meter workingarea, over one open edge.

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  • Vertical Line

Restraint Systems

Vertical Line

This system of work will allow users to be able to safety set up and stay in restraint when using a single adjustable rope line, anchored at the optimum position ‘fall factor 0’ (above their head). This will give them access to a 1 meter workingarea, over one open edge.

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  • Parallel Lines

Restraint Systems

Parallel Lines

This system of work will allow users to work in restraint over a wide area. They will be able to safety set up and stay in restraint when using two adjustable rope lines, that are anchored parallel to their working edge ‘fall factor 2’ (foot level).This will give them access to wider working area, over one open edge.

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  • Triangulated Lines

Restraint Systems

Triangulated Lines

This system of work will allow users to be able to safety set up and stay in restraint when working over two or four leading edges. Users will be able to set up and use two adjustable rope lines, that are anchored diagonally across their workingarea. This will give them access to wider working areas, over two or four open edges.

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  • Single Pitched Lines

Restraint Systems

Single Pitched Lines

This system of work will allow users to be able to safety set up and stay in restraint when using a single adjustable rope line on a pitched surface through attaching to the front of their harnesses. This will give them access to a 2 meter workingarea, over one open edge.

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  • Parallel Pitched Line

Restraint Systems

Parallel Pitched Lines

This system of work will allow users to be able to safety set up and stay in restraint when using two adjustable rope lines attached to the front of their harness. This system will give users access to wider working areas, over two or three openedges

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  • Lanyards

Lanyards

Lanyards are the most extensively used piece of equipment in the height safety arsenal. It’s no surprise given their versatility for preventing operatives from entering a fall hazard up to a 2m edge distance. You can discover up to 5 differentkinds of lanyard to achieve a range of access from simple fixed locations to climbing and the traversal of complex structures. This is your chance to reaffirm lessons learnt during theory modules and practice connecting to harnesses and anchoragewhile gaining the invaluable ability to select the right lanyards for your applications. We’ll continuously verify your competency along the way!

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  • Variable Lanyards

Lanyards

Variable Lanyards

Allow users to work within the proximity of an edge under restraint, each lanyard can be varied in length from 1m-2m in a range of materials to suit the needs of the job or working at height situation.

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  • Fixed Lanyards

Lanyards

Fixed Lanyards

Allow users to work in restraint with restricted access to the open edge, due to the lanyard being a fixed distance suitable for that situation or individual’s needs. Fixed lanyards can be purchased in any individual length form 0.5m-2m in a range ofmaterials to suit the needs of the job or working at height situation.

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(Video) Leading Edge Protection | What is Leading Edge | Lecture 54 NEBOSH Unit 2 Element 8
  • Adjustable Lanyards

Lanyards

Adjustable Lanyards

Allow users the ability to work within restraint, but with the freedom to continuously adjust their system to work within the proximately of an open edge or edges. Adjustable lanyards can be purchased in any individual length to suit the needs of thejob or working at height situation and offer a built in fall arrest safety system also.

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  • Twin Lanyards

Lanyards

Twin Lanyards

Allow users to stay continuously tied off when climbing or moving between anchor points. Twin lanyards come in various forms and types of materials to suit the needs of the job or working at height situation but ensure 100% tie off.

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  • Shock-Absorbing Lanyards

Lanyards

Shock-Absorbing Lanyards

Form part of the fall arrest PPE, they can vary in lengths and materials from 0.5- 2m or even twins to suit the needs of the job or working at height situation. They will safely reduce the impact of a fall.

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  • Lifelines

Lifelines

Lifelines prevent pendulum and provide greater levels of access when working over large areas as the added use of a pulley allows you to safely traverse the edge along which the lifeline is set. You’ll learn how to deploy, position and tension alifeline, operate it using front and rear attachment across horizontal and pitched planes, and explore more advanced techniques such as lifeline bending for multiple edge access and intermediate attachments to support multiple simultaneous users.

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  • 1 User Lifeline

Lifelines

1 User Lifeline

Allows a single user to remain within restraint when accessing one open edge spanning up 20 meters.

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  • 3 User Lifeline

Lifelines

3 User Lifeline

Allows up to three users to remain within restraint when accessing one open edge spanning up 10 meters.

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  • Lifeline Bending

Lifelines

Lifeline Bending

Bent lifelines allow a single user to remain within restraint when accessing two open edge spanning 2x10meter.

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  • Intermediate Devices

Lifelines

Intermediate Devices

The use of a lifeline with an attached intermediate will allow a two to three users to remain within restraint when accessing one open edge spanning up 20 meters.

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  • Total Time
  • 1 Hour
  • 1½ Hours
  • 2½ hours
  • 1½ Hours
(Video) Edge Protection New Zealand Limited Training Video

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Theory Modules

Our Theory Modules cover a wide range working at height topics. Think of them like bricks; we select the ones that matter most to you and arrange them to build your course. So, whether you're an operative, supervisor or manager you'll gaintheoretical knowledge that has direct association to the work that you do — in bite-size and easy-to-follow segments.

Click a Theory Module to learn more.

  • Theory Modules
  • Basic Awareness
  • Level 1
  • Level 1+
  • Level 2
  • Foundations

Foundations

Before you start we have a quick recap of the information learned earlier in the course to double check everyone has remembered how to fit and adjust their harnesses correctly before setting foot near an edge.

  • Legislation

Legislation

Anchorage forms the foundation of your height access system and any mistakes made here makes all subsequent efforts worthless. In phase 2 You'll learn which anchorage devices to use and in which configurations to place based on your work area and theleading edge.

  • DEP

Definitions, Equipment & Practices

Fall arrest blocks increase mobility but the trade-off is they allow you to fall. If that happens the blocks lock like a car seat belt and (hence the title) arrest your fall. Because falling is permitted caution is required, so we show you strictrules and practises that enable you to use them safely for work at height.

  • HCM

Hierarchy of Control Measures

Before work at height can begin each task must be assessed for risk and appropriate safety measures should be placed where needed. To do this we’ll utilize the Hierarchy of Control Measures, which outlines a step-by-step procedure to guide your height access provisions. We’ll start at the top with the safest possible procedure (avoiding the need to work at height all-together) and move down the hierarchy with progressively hazardous scenarios, giving you the knowledge to conduct your own future assessments using the HCM.

  • Harnesses

Harnesses

Throw it over your shoulders, clip it together, fasten the leg straps andyou’re good to go, right? Be under no illusions, a damaged or incorrectlyworn harness can lead to death, or if you’re truly unlucky, extremetesticular trauma and rectal damage! To prevent such a nauseating fatewe’ll take you back to basics, familiarise you with different types ofheight safety harnesses and their various purposes, teach you how toperform pre-use inspections and then get down to the nuts and boltsof how to don and adjust it. At the end of the module each of you willbe provided with your own harness to practise wearing, which will bethen be assessed by the instructor to make sure the whole team iscompetent and confident before moving on.

  • Intermediate Devices

Intermediate Devices

Once you have an understanding of what arrest and restraint methods are we take a deeper a look at intermediate devices, which work together between your anchor point and harness to form a height safety system. These include inertia reels, lanyards, lifelines, connectors and anchorage. We walk you through each device, demonstrating how they function, how you use them, what their limitations and performance capabilities are and the practices and work methods that enable you to use them correctly in applications.

  • Anchorage

Anchorage

Anchorage is the rst and arguably the most important link in the height safety chain. The challenge is knowing what constitutes a safe anchorage point and how to select the right anchorage device to connect with out of a myriad of di erent options and con gurations. To help you understand we’ll start by exploring permanent anchor points comprising of xed structures in your environment and move on to temporary solutions. Finally we’ll talk in depth about available anchorage devices and analyse their speci c uses, con gurations, ratings and certi cation to give you the theoretical knowledge to identify and set up suitable anchorage for your height safety system.

(Video) Ladder Access Point | Leading Edge Safety
  • Height Rescue 101

Height Rescue 101

Higher up in the height safety heirarchy are Restraint Systems. These systems offer the same level of access as Fall Arrest Blocks but are considered a safer and more desirable method of work since the use of ropes physically 'restrains' yourproximity to and edge. Restraint Systems are extremely versatile, allowing for both front and rear connection in serveral configurations accross horizontal, vertical and pitched planes. Some or all of which you'll discover and practice depending onyour course.

  • Kit Care

Kit Care

Working at height puts your life in the hands of your equipment, so it’s in your interest to make sure your kit is t for use. To ensure safety we’ll teach you the importance of frequent kit inspection and outline the basic principles of product and service life. We’ll then explore both the causes and visual indicators of degradation on a variety of di erent products, helping you keep your kit in good condition by handling, storing and transporting it appropriately and identifying damage when conducting daily pre-use inspections.

  • Weekly Kit Inspection

Kit Inspection

Formal equipment inspection is a requirement that must be conducted by a competent person on a 6-monthly basis. To understand your legal responsibilities we’ll introduce you to the inspections process for a full range of PPE and demonstrate how to record the relevant paperwork. Towards the end of the module is a practical exercise in which groups complete a harness inspection test, which gives them the con dence to conduct kit inspections for height safety harnesses.

  • Dropped Objects

Dropped Objects

Dropped objects are a serious risk, and not just to people, to anything below a work area where hand-held equipment can fall. In Dropped Objects we have a frank discussion about the problems associated with untethered tools, cover some mind-blowing physics about the impact force even the tiniest objects can generate, and lay down the law regarding individual and company liability resulting from injury. Finally we explore some tool tethering solutions available to you today, so you can start to safely secure your tools at height.

  • Risk Assessment

Risk Assessment

For many the thought of conducting a riskassessment seems laborious and over-demanding, butit needn’t be di cult and if done properly willmake all the di erence. A good risk assessmentensures employees stay safe and should an accidentoccur you’ll have the paperwork to back up thefact you did all you could be reasonably expectedto do. To get you started we dive right in andshow you how to easily identify hazards, considerwho might be harmed, evaluate risks and record andimplement your ndings into a pain-free riskassessment.

  • Method Statements

Method Statements

Those responsible for planning work at height are legally required to provide a method statement, a document explaining the way tasks should be completed. It outlines in detail the hazards involved and provides a guide on how to complete the job safely. With examples, we’ll walk you through the process of creating a strong, simple and e ective method statement that communicates risks and necessary precautions to all those involved in work at height, whilst avoiding the pitfall of ambiguities or generalisations that could lead to confusion.

  • Planning Work Activity

Planning Work Activity

You’ve sat through the all modules, now it’s time to put it all together! Using the knowledge gained throughout the course we give you several mock scenarios and challenge you in teams to conduct visual risk assessments, decide upon suitable anchorage locations and select equipment for work at height. In an informal discussion each group will then explain and debate their decision making process to demonstrate their ability to plan for a variety of work activities.

  • Exam
  • Total Time
  • 2 Hours
  • 3Hours
  • 4 hours
  • 5 Hours

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Videos

1. Leading Edge Safety | Stinger Overview
(Big Rock Supply)
2. Leading Edge Construction eLearning courses
(Leading Edge Global)
3. Standing on the Edge
(WorkSafeBC)
4. Fall Protection for Leading Edge and Sharp Edge (M5V2 Leading-Sharp Edge)
(Oregon Occupational Safety & Health (Oregon OSHA))
5. Temporary Fall Protection from Leading Edge Safety
(Leading Edge Safety)
6. Leading Edge Safety | TriRex Overview
(Big Rock Supply)
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