Creative Arts Expression - Colorado Early Learning & Development Guidelines (2023)

The Creative Arts domain describes the variety of artistic activities that allow children to use their imaginations, creativity, and express ideas in a variety of mediums. Included in this domain are indicators for dance, drama and theatre arts, music, and visual arts. The creative arts provide a means for children to display their understanding of a wide variety of knowledge and ideas that are part of other domains.

The 2015 ELOF does not include Creative Arts Expression, content in this domain is written verbatim from the 2020 Preschool Visual and Performing Arts Colorado Academic Standards (CAS).

Creative Arts Expression (Dance)

Indicators
Children may . . .

Examples
Children may. . .

Suggested Supports
Adults may . . .

1. Movement: The use of the body to move to music and express oneself.

  1. Safely practice simplelocomotor and non-locomotor movements.
  2. Explore movement in timeand space using shape, size, level, direction, stillness and transference ofweight (stepping).
  3. Explore movement toencourage (kinesthetic) body awareness.
  4. Explore simple phrasesof movement to experience rhythm, clapping and moving to music in relationshipto others.
  • March and dance to music orrhythmical sounds.
  • Suggest a way to move (e.g.,like a butterfly) during the transition from outdoors to indoors.
  • Participate in jumping/leapingover “rivers” spread around the room.
  • Provide ample time daily for children to use their bodies to move in a variety of ways, both indoors and outdoors.
  • Arrange for large open spaces where children can move freely and small spaces (e.g., carpet squares, hula hoops, low balance beam) for children to practice more controlled movements.
  • Enjoy participating alongside children in planned and spontaneous movement and dance activities.
  • Model and integrate different movements (e.g., twist, bend, hop, slide, roll, stretch) into the daily routines.
  • Use correct vocabulary when referring to movements (e.g., gallop, twist, stretch, balance).
  • Include movements that children with physical disabilities can perform with different parts of their bodies.
  • Challenge children to think of specific ways to travel to various areas.
  • Bring attention to a child’s created movements and invite others to observe, imitate and suggest their individual ideas.

2. Create, Compose, and Choreograph: Using the dance elements of space, time, and energy to explore, improvise, and develop movement phrases, sequences and dances.

  1. Create movements inresponse to sensory ideas (textures, colors, smells) and images from nature.
  2. Move to expressdifferent feelings in personal and general space.
  3. Explore movement whilemoving with objects (scarves, feathers, balls).
  4. Transfer same movementsto different body parts and use repetition.
  • Describe why you chose thosespecific movements to express a certain emotion.
  • Demonstrate a creativemovement in pretend play (e.g., a cat pouncing on a ball, a fish swimming inthe classroom aquarium, a rocket ship lifting off).
  • Participate moving creativelyto instrumental music.
  • Lead a simple movement patternfor others to copy.
  • Provide an environment thatencourages children to use movement to recognize and understand feelings.
  • Invite children to move in waysthat demonstrate how a character in a story might feel or move in response to aproblem.
  • Ask children to recall afamiliar activity such as a field trip, daily routine or special event usingmovement to represent the experience.
  • Provide a variety of props toinspire children to explore or make up their own creative movements.
  • Connect movement or dance to a curriculumstudy and integrate throughout the daily routine.
  • In reading stories, look for words and imagesthat suggest movement, pause and encourage children to use movement torepresent the word/image.
  • Model patterns of movements, starting simplyand increasing complexity as appropriate.

3. Historical and Cultural Context: Understanding the global and cultural relevance of dance.

  1. Explore how danceexpresses ideas and emotions.
  2. Explore occasions fordance across different cultures.
  3. Explore shapes, levelsand patterns in a dance, and describe the actions.
  • Bring in a photo to showand/or talk about an occasion in which they experienced dance.
  • Watch a performance withinterest and begin to copy a movement observed in a dance.
  • Ask families to share traditional music and dances from their cultures.
  • Invite family members and community groups to the classroom to speak about and teach children a dance.
  • Provide a range of music such as classical, jazz, rock, rap, salsa and props from various cultures to imitate dance experiences.
  • Use photographs, short video and books about dance/movement performed by various groups of people.
  • Ask children to share personal stories about times in which they have seen or participated in cultural dances.
(Video) Creativity in the classroom (in 5 minutes or less!) | Catherine Thimmesh | TEDxUniversityofStThomas

4. Reflect, Connect, and Respond: Reflecting upon dance, connecting it with other disciplines, responding to it to discuss and analyze dance as art.

  1. Experience the joy of seeing and responding to dance.
  2. Demonstrate movement to express emotion.
  3. Express what is seen and felt in a movement with different tempos, rhythms and genres.
  4. View a performance with attention.
  5. Describe the dance in your own words.
  6. Show your favorite dance move to the performers or each other.
  • Clap following a danceperformance by a classmate or guest.
  • Imitate a movement seen in adance performance.
  • Tell what was enjoyed in aparticular dance.
  • Show excitement to watch acreative movement or dance performance.
  • Comment on or imitate amovement that was observed in a dance.
  • Explore the process ofcreating an art work in response to a dance performance (e.g., drawing,painting, invented movement).
  • Clap in appreciation of aperformance.
  • Plan opportunities in the classroom for children to observe and respond to a variety of dance genres performed by peers, family members, local community groups or professionals.
  • Model asking a question or sharing a thought about a creative movement or dance.
  • Model using words or actions to describe what was liked about a particular performance.
  • Integrate a range of music in daily routine for children to listen and freely move to.
  • Invite a special guest or group to the classroom to demonstrate a creative movement or dance performance.
  • Attend performances in settings outside the classroom such as a trip to a local rehearsal or performance.
  • Model and talk about appropriate audience behaviors of watching, listening and showing appreciation.
  • Model describing or responding to a space of a particular dance work

Creative Arts Expression (Drama and Theater Arts)

Indicators
Children may . . .

Examples
Children may. . .

Suggested Supports
Adults may . . .

1. Create: Creating and forming theatrical works, interpreting theatrical works for performance and design, and developing characters and analyzing roles.

  1. Create characters and environmentsusing imagination and background knowledge through dramatic play or guideddrama experience (story drama, creative drama, movement stories, pantomimes,puppetry, etc.).
  2. Generate multiple representationsof a single object in a variety of dramatic experiences (e.g., story drama,creative drama, movement stories, pantomime, puppetry etc.).
  3. Communicate ideas through actions and wordsusing imagination and background knowledge in dramatic play or a guided dramaexperience (e.g., story drama, creative drama, movement stories, pantomimes,puppetry etc.).
  4. Investigate story in dramatic playor a guided drama experience (e.g.story drama, creative drama, movementstories, pantomimes, puppetry, etc).
  5. Apply personal experiences to astory in dramatic play or a guided drama experience (e.g., story drama,creative drama, movement stories, pantomime, puppetry, etc.).
  • Identify an emotion or feelingin connection to a particular action, facial expression or word.
  • Use speech or sounds toimitate a person or object.
  • Draw pictures or tellstories of their own experiences in order to form dramatic play.
  • Listen to stories anduse them as a jumping-off point for dramatic play.
  • Recall an experiencewhile exploring within dramatic play.
  • Provide ample time and space, indoors and outdoors, for children to engage in dramatic play and storytelling in their own way.
  • Dramatize stories from children’s cultural and personal experiences by asking families to share stories.
  • Represent various characters using facial expression, body movement and gestures.
  • Ask students to draw a picture or tell stories of their own experiences as a prompt for dramatic play.
  • Engage students’ background knowledge through questioning as a prompt for dramatic play. (For example, “When was a time you were courageous?”)
  • Tell or read a story as a jumping-off point for dramatic play.
  • Model by sharing a personal or shared class experience.

2. Perform: Expressing the human experience in story, movement, speech, and staging for an intended audience.

(Video) What is Art Therapy?

  1. Make appropriate character reactions that connect environment or cultures of the story using imagination or background knowledge in a dramatic play or a guided drama experience (e.g., story drama, creative drama, movement stories, pantomime, puppetry, etc.).
  2. Create characters using body and voice in dramatic play or a guided drama experience (e.g., story drama, creative drama, movement stories, pantomime, puppetry, etc.).
  3. Explore and experiment with various design or technical elements in dramatic play or a guided drama experience.
  4. Interpret character choices and emotions using voice and body in dramatic play or a guided drama experience (e.g., story drama, creative drama, movement stories, pantomime, puppetry, etc.).
  • React to shared culturalor everyday experiences.
  • Create a character usingvoice, body and facial expression from an adult’s modeling.
  • Utilize technical elementssuch as lighting, costumes, props, etc. to help tell stories, create moods,build environments and define characters.
  • Choose various facialexpressions, body movements, gestures and vocal choices to express characteremotions to character choices.
  • Describe or share about acultural experience.
  • Build or re-create culturalexperiences for children.
  • Model characters or utilizebooks, movies, real life community members, animals, etc. as a way to showvarious characters.
  • Discuss and create experiencesshowing how technical elements help to tell stories, create mood, buildenvironments and define characters.
  • Ask reflective questionsconcerning a dramatic play or guided drama such as, “How did your characterfeel when the wolf knocked on the door?” “What did you do when your characterfelt that way?”
  • Lead discussions to compareemotions and ways to portray each.

3. Respond: Responding to the artistic and scientific knowledge of conventions, cultures, styles, genres, theories, and technologies needed to know better choices and best practices.

  1. Recall an emotional response in dramatic play or a guided drama experience.
  2. Reflect on choices in a dramatic play and guided drama experiences.
  3. Name and describe characters in a dramatic play or a guided drama.
  4. Recognize artistic choices.
  5. Identify and connect stories and cultural experiences that are similar to one another in dramatic play or a guided drama experience.
  • Express (through vocalizations or movements) how his/her character felt, moved, vocalized or gestured when thinking about various moments in a dramatic play or guided drama.
  • Answer questions using vocalizations or movements to define and describe characters.
  • Answer questions and express ideas through movements or vocalizations that define their artistic choices.
  • Connect personal experiences and express ideas in reaction to a story through movements or vocalization.
  • Ask reflective questions concerning a dramatic play or guided drama such as, “How did your character feel when the wolf knocked on the door?” “What did you do when your character felt that way?”
  • Ask reflective “what questions” on student experiences such as, “What did your biggest shape look like? or”What movement was the most sharp”?
  • Utilize story to have students define a character’s appearance and feelings. For example, “Which characters came to help?” “What did the animals look like?” “What did the characters do when they received help?”
  • Use questions to lead discussion, for example, “When was the character really scared?” “What did we do to create the environment?” “What was your favorite…”
  • Ask reflective questions that connect personal experiences to a story, for example, “What are ways your family celebrates different holidays?”

Creative Arts Expression (Music)

Indicators
Children may . . .

Examples
Children may. . .

Suggested Supports
Adults may . . .

1. Music Expression: The use of voice and instruments to create sounds.

  1. Use voices expressively when speaking, chanting,and singing.
  2. Perform through multiple modalities a variety ofsimple songs and singing games alone and with others.
  3. Use voice and/or instruments to enhance familiarsongs or chants.
  4. Respond to rhythmicpatterns and elements of music using expressive movement.
  5. Apply teacher feedbackfor progress of musical practice and experience.
  • Sing along to verses of songs that have a repeated pattern.
  • Act out actions in songs.
  • Play with instruments to create different sounds.
    • Clap hands in response to music with various beats.
    • Make vocal sounds.
    • Use words such as loud or soft, fast or slow to describe music.
    • Move arms up to high notes and down to low notes.
    • Sing along with recordings of learned songs.
    • Choose when to appropriately sing, speak, and chant the words of a learned song.
    • Practice using high and low vocal sounds.
    • Play singing games.
  • Enjoy making and listening to music.
  • Use their voices in different ways (e.g., varying volume, imitating sounds of machines, actions, animals and various characters) while reading a book, telling a story or singing.
  • Incorporate simple songs throughout the daily routine and transitions.
  • Introduce parts of a song and repeat until everyone learns the words. Incorporate sign or actions to the words.
  • Read children’s books based on songs and encourage children’s participation in multiple ways.
  • Provide a variety of appropriate instruments (e.g., maracas, rhythm sticks, bells, tambourines, drums) for children to use for musical experimentation.
  • Sing a tone or make a sound and invite children to repeat or echo it.
  • Experiment with having children match sounds, beats, words, pitches and speed.
  • Play music from different cultures and traditions.
  • Sing songs or play music suggested by children’s families.
  • Offer different types of music rhythms, patterns and tempos and invite children to clap, tap or move to the beat.
  • Provide many opportunities for children to hear or feel the vibrations of music with a prominent and steady beat.
  • Use recorded models of children singing songs.
  • Model contrasting ways of singing/speaking songs.
  • Help students identify missed words of a song.
  • Play singing games.
  • Break songs down into parts for students to echo-sing.
(Video) What is Art?

2. Creation of Music: Compose, improvise, and arrange sounds and musical ideas to communicate purposeful intent.

  1. Improvise sound effects to accompany play activities
  2. Use improvised movement to demonstrate musical awareness
  • Move or play in response to music.
  • Improvise sound effects during play
  • Enjoy participating alongside children in creating different sounds during pretend play.
  • Listen to and imitate children’s sound effects.
  • Comment on the ways children use their voices or make sound effects to encourage further experimentation.
  • Call attention to sounds in the indoor and outdoor environment.
  • Use music or sound to enhance routines and learning activities such as playing the same piece of music to signal a cleanup time.

3. Theory of Music. Read, write, and analyze the elements of music through a variety of means to demonstrate musical literacy.

  1. Use individual means to respond to rhythm.
  2. Use individual means to respond to pitch.
  3. Use individual means to respond to dynamics.
  4. Use individual means to respond to form.
  5. Use invented symbols to represent musical soundsand ideas.
  6. Use personal communication to describe sourcesof sound.
  7. Use individual means to respond to dynamics andtempo.
  8. Recognize a wide varietyof sounds and sound sources.
  • Use words or other expression to say why they like music.
  • Use words or other expression to describe differences in music.
  • Share why they like some music better than others.
  • Communicate a song’s meaning and intent through drawing or painting (e.g.drawing farm animals while listening to “Old MacDonald”).
  • Move arms up to high notes and down to low notes.
  • Identify types of sounds (voice vs instrument).
  • Use words to identify sounds they hear in their world.
  • Communicate a song’s meaning and intent through drawing or painting (e.g. drawing farm animals while listening to “Old MacDonald”).
  • Move arms up to high notes and down to low notes.
  • Identify types of sounds (voice vs instrument).
  • Use words to identify sounds they hear in their world.
  • Play their favorite kinds of music with children and tell what they like about it.
  • Play and discuss a variety of musical styles.
  • Invite children to compare their responses to different types of music.
  • Ask questions such as how a piece of music makes them feel, what they do or do not like about it and how it is similar to other music they have heard.
  • Provide opportunities for children to listen to recorded music while drawing or painting.
  • Model moving arms up when hearing high notes and down with low notes.
  • Demonstrate a variety of vocal and instrumental sounds.
  • Play sounds that students may hear in their world (e.g., train whistle, thunderstorm, a concert).
  • Provide opportunities for children to listen to recorded music while drawing or painting.
  • Model moving arms up when hearing high notes and down with low notes.
  • Demonstrate a variety of vocal and instrumental sounds.
  • Play sounds that students may hear in their world (e.g., train whistle, thunderstorm, a concert).

4. Aesthetic Valuation of Music. Evaluate and respond to music using criteria to make informed musical decisions.

  1. Move, sing, or describe to show preference for styles of music.
  2. Discuss feelings in response to music.
  3. Use individual communication to describe music.
  4. Explore music from media, community, and home events.
  5. Listen and respond to various musical styles (such as marches and lullabies).
  6. Communicate feelings in music.
  7. Express personal interests regarding why some music selections are preferred over others.
  • Children move, dance, sing in response to music.
  • Children indicate preference for certain songs or styles of music.
  • Request their favorite music.
  • Move in different ways to different styles of music (children’s songs, lullabies, jazz, marches, etc.).
  • Bounce, sway, walk, march, skip to music.
  • Model and talk about why they chose to listen to a particular musical selection.
  • Plan classroom experiences in which children are exposed to a variety of musical styles.
  • Provide children with access to an organized music area and supply with a range of recorded music (e.g., classical, jazz, rock, rap, salsa) and props (e.g., scarves, ribbons, bells) for children to access independently to explore ways to move to music.
  • Provide children with opportunities to express opinions about music through verbal response, movement, and play.
  • Play a variety of music styles for children.
  • Demonstrate movement to music (e.g., marching, skipping, walking, rocking).
  • Encourage free movement to music of various styles.

Creative Arts Expression (Visual Arts)

Indicators
Children may . . .

Examples
Children may. . .

(Video) Find Your Artistic Voice - 3 Tips to Develop Your Creativity | Adobe Creative Cloud

Suggested Supports
Adults may . . .

1. Observe and Learn to Comprehend: Identify art in daily surroundings.

  1. Select images in materials such as but notlimited to books, cartoons, computer games and environmental print.
  2. Use age-appropriate communication to describeworks of art.
  3. Recognize basic language of art and design inrelation to daily surroundings.
  • Move with a variety of coloredscarves noticing how color and shape are changed by the light and movement.
  • Bring attention to patterns,shapes, lines or colors found in objects and design inside as well as in natureand the outdoor environment.
  • Comment or draw attention to afeature of a food item or packaging at snack or meal time.
  • Ask a question about a work ofart.
  • Notice and discuss theillustrations in picture books as inspiration for making original art.
  • Help decide which of their artworks should be displayed.
  • Point out images of personal preferencefound in the everyday and connect to stories about their life.
  • Incorporate art experiences throughout the daily routine.
  • Stress process over product when viewing a work of art.
  • Post or make available visual representations such as photographs of familiar objects, places and illustrations from books in the art area.
  • Hang art reproductions showing familiar experiences.
  • Provide opportunities for children to explore and classify various art media. For example, children may sort photographs or sculpture, collage, drawings and paintings into groups.
  • Provide opportunities for children to discover art in their homes, classroom, center or school and community.
  • Display children’s art creations attractively and prominently in the art room, as much as possible at children’s eye level.
  • Display collaborative work, such as but not limited to murals, as well as individual work.
  • Remove displays before the room becomes cluttered or when children lose interest.
  • Prioritize the display of children’s art over commercially purchased posters.

2. Envision and Critique to Reflect: Evaluate the effectiveness of what is made during the creative process.

  1. Explain that works of art communicate ideas andtell stories.
  2. Communicate a story about a work of art.
  3. Discuss one’s own artistic creations and thoseof others.
  • Tell the story of their ownwork.
  • Show or tell the steps used inmaking own art.
  • Use the illustrations of booksas inspiration to create their own story.
  • Include various art forms, materials and techniques representing children’s cultures.
  • Encourage children to take art home to share with families.
  • Encourage children to talk about their art by commenting on colors, textures, techniques and patterns.
  • Share wordless picture books and invite children to tell the story.
  • Display children’s art at their eye level within the classroom (with their permission) to encourage discussion.
  • Provide a safe space for children’s works-in-progress to be labeled and stored to encourage children to extend elaborating on their work over subsequent days.
  • Ask questions that encourage children to think about their creations and why they made particular choices.
  • Display prints of fine art and books that include art reproductions.
  • Ask children to dictate stories about artwork they have created.
  • Take photos of children’s work and record their explanations.

3. Invent and Discover to Create: Use different skills to generate works of art for functional, expressive, conceptual, and social/cultural purposes.

  1. Explore the process of creating works of art atone’s own pace that arrive at an individual desired outcome.
  2. Use art materials freely, safely and withrespect in any environment.
  3. Engage in the process of creating visualnarratives from familiar stories and subject matter.
  • Use a combination of materialsin an inventive way.
  • Try a variety of techniques.
  • Dictate about the subject ofpersonal artwork.
  • After several readings of afavorite story, participate in a process that represents the story.
  • Learn by discovery such as byfinding out what happens when colors are mixed rather than being told ahead oftime.
  • Make choices about theirartwork and envision what might happen if they make changes or additions to awork of art.
  • Provide children with access to an organized art area and supply with a variety of developmentally appropriate art materials and emphasize open-ended, process-oriented activities.
  • Designate an area where children can be free to use art materials and be messy; provide cleaning tools and model how to use them to clean up when finished.
  • Plan art activities that extend children’s understanding of art techniques and art media.
  • Introduce children to vocabulary used in the visual arts (e.g., line, color, shape, sculpture, collage) during hands-on activities and explorations.
  • Stress the process over product.
  • Label how children describe areas, techniques or subject matter in their artwork.
  • Respect children’s work and ask permission to write directly on their picture.
  • Write children’s narratives about their artwork on sticky notes or labels and attach to side or beneath their picture to encourage families to discuss the artwork with their child.

4. Relate and Connect to Transfer: Make new connections to their own environments, cultures, and stories through the process of making art.

  1. Explain what an artist does and who an artistcan be.
  2. Identify some of the activities in which artistsparticipate.
  3. Identify arts materials used by artists.
  • Make decisions about, request and use names for art materials while working in the art center (such as but not limited to pastels, clay, yarn, etc.).
  • Draw children’s attention to the illustrations in a book and read about the artist. For example, children may make a work of art inspired by the process and materials choice of the illustrator.
  • Invite family members or local artists to talk about the materials, tools and techniques they used to create a piece of artwork.
  • Use the correct art vocabulary for materials, tools and actions (in English as well as in any other of the children’s home languages) while children are actively engaged in working with art materials.
  • Plan opportunities for children to see artists in action.
(Video) Art therapy: a world beyond creative expression | Carol Hammal | TEDxGUC

FAQs

What is creative expression in early childhood? ›

Creative expression refers to how children use music, movement, building, and play to express themselves. From a very early age, children demonstrate an interest in sounds, colors, objects, and textures.

What are the 4 Creative Arts? ›

Creative Arts - Creative Arts

Creative Arts exposes learners to four art forms: dance, drama, music and the visual arts. The main purpose of Creative Arts is to develop learners as creative, imaginative individuals, with an appreciation of the arts.

What is expression in Creative Arts? ›

Creative expression is the ability to use our minds and imaginations to create something that represents ourselves. There are countless ways to express ourselves creatively, whether through music, visual art, crafting, writing, photography, drama, or movement.

What are some examples of creative expression? ›

Painting, coloring, writing, making music, and making crafts are all creative activities. Creative expression helps children articulate their feelings and thoughts. They think critically about their world and practice visual communication.

What is creative arts in early childhood education? ›

In relation to children, the creative arts are activities that engage a child's imagination and can include activities such as art, dance, drama, puppetry, and music.

How do you teach creative expressions? ›

7 Ways to Encourage Creative Expression
  1. Be your child's biggest fan. Encourage and praise him for being an individual.
  2. Don't judge. Make sure your child feels comfortable and unrestrained when she is exploring her talents.
  3. Go through the motions. ...
  4. Use props. ...
  5. Sound it out. ...
  6. Let loose. ...
  7. Get in on the action.

What are two skills that are taught under Creative Arts? ›

Skills developed through participation in the arts are increasingly important in the workplace and therefore, key to a successful career.
  • CREATIVITY. ...
  • CONFIDENCE. ...
  • PROBLEM SOLVING.
  • PERSEVERANCE. ...
  • FOCUS. ...
  • NON-VERBAL.
  • RECEIVING.
  • COLLABORATION DEVELOPING.

Why is creative art important in early childhood? ›

Artistic activities foster intellectual development and some of their benefits are: Stimulates both sides of the brain. Increases the capacity of memory, attention and concentration. Helps develop reading skills and children do better in math and science. Introduces children to new vocabulary and concepts.

What is the main purpose of Creative Arts? ›

The purpose of Creative Arts is to develop learners as creative, imaginative individuals, with an appreciation of the arts. It also provides basic knowledge and skills to be able to participate in creative activities.

What are the 7 elements of artistic expression? ›

ELEMENTS OF ART: The visual components of color, form, line, shape, space, texture, and value.

How can you introduce children to examples of creative expression in? ›

Introduce children to a variety of excellent examples of creative expression in art, architecture, inventions, music and dance. Use a range of books, stories and other media that lead to loving beautiful, powerful text. Allow big blocks of time and encourage efforts that extend over days or weeks.

How creative expression can impact today's issues? ›

From a societal perspective, art can be a unifying force to decreasing social barriers and strengthening interpersonal connections. Creative expression also has the power to improve well-being by helping us understand ourselves and shifting perspectives that reinforce positive behaviors.

How can creative expression help children articulate their feelings? ›

Creative expression offers children an opportunity to develop important skills that support positive social emotional health including the ability to name and identify their own feelings, think critically about the world around them and practice self-regulation for positive behavior management.

What is the difference between social art and creative art? ›

While a traditional artist uses their creative skills to express their take on the world, a social artist puts their skills to use to help promote and improve communities. Thus, the main aim of a social artist is to improve society as a whole and to help other people find their own means of creative expression.

What are some ways to promote children's creative thinking and expression? ›

8 Ways to Encourage Creative Thinking in Children
  1. Make Children Question Things. ...
  2. Provide Opportunities to Express Their Intelligence. ...
  3. Teach Them Multiple Ways to Solve Every Problem. ...
  4. Trigger Their Curiosity. ...
  5. Engage Them With Activity Boxes. ...
  6. Encourage Children to Read for Pleasure. ...
  7. Give Them Free Time & Space.
16 Jul 2019

How do you promote expressions in the classroom? ›

How to Encourage Self Expression in Students
  1. Arts as a medium for expression. ...
  2. Talk to them about their feelings. ...
  3. Encourage exploration. ...
  4. Offer them choices. ...
  5. Let them develop their own style. ...
  6. Encourage them to write each day. ...
  7. Take them outdoors once in a while. ...
  8. Facilitate sport activities.
15 Jan 2022

What are the 5 art skills? ›

13 Examples of fine artist skills
  • Communication. Fine artists use communication skills when working with clients. ...
  • Realistic drawing. ...
  • Constructive drawing. ...
  • Time management. ...
  • Drawing from life. ...
  • Drawing from memory and imagination. ...
  • Knowledge of art materials. ...
  • Networking.
11 Aug 2021

What to teach in Creative Arts? ›

In Creative Arts, learners are exposed to dance, drama, music and visual arts. The purpose of this subject is to develop learners as creative, imaginative individuals with an appreciation of the arts.

What are the five importance of creative art? ›

The study of Creative Arts develops emotional intelligence, confidence and resilience, discipline and commitment, communications skills, identity and belonging, creativity and problem-solving skills and coordination.

What are the 10 common principles of art? ›

The ten common principles of art are balance, emphasis, harmony, movement, pattern, proportion, repetition, rhythm, unity, and variety. Many of these concepts are not only related to one another but also overlap to create an artistic vision.

What are the 9 principles of art? ›

The 9 Principles of Design Are: Contrast, Emphasis, Movement, Repetition, Proportion, Rhythm, Balance, Unity, and Variety and they are the foundations of creating art and are the rules for how Artists arrange elements or the Elements of Art to create an Artwork.

Why is it important to understand the 7 elements of art? ›

They are the building blocks used to create a work of art. Students who can identify the elements and evaluate their role in the composition of a work of art will be better able to understand an artist's choices. They will be equipped to address whether a work of art is successful, and why.

What are three main types of creative expressions? ›

Commonly identified methods include drama, dance, music, creative writing and the visual arts, including photography.

What are the 4 main categories of art styles? ›

In this website, we'll explore four of the main styles that I work in: photorealism, abstract, whimsical, and composite (combined styles). In time, I will add more information about other artistic styles, but for now we'll focus on the four styles that I am most familiar with, in both theory and practice.

What are the 3 types of art? ›

The three fine arts of painting, sculpture, and architecture are sometimes also called the “major arts”, with “minor arts” referring to commercial or decorative art styles. Architecture is the only form of fine visual art with a sense of utility or elements of practicality.

What are the 5 traits of a creative person? ›

5 MAIN CHARACTERISTICS OF CREATIVE PEOPLE - SEE IF YOU HAVE ANY OF THOSE
  • They are risk takers. Creative thinkers are risk takers. ...
  • They have the dare to fail attitude. Failure for them is a learning curve. ...
  • They are willing to be different. ...
  • They are impulsive, fickle and change their mind quite often.
9 Apr 2017

Is creativity a talent or a skill? ›

Creativity Isn't a Talent — It's a Skill You Can Learn.

How can you introduce children to examples of creative expression in? ›

Introduce children to a variety of excellent examples of creative expression in art, architecture, inventions, music and dance. Use a range of books, stories and other media that lead to loving beautiful, powerful text. Allow big blocks of time and encourage efforts that extend over days or weeks.

Why is expression important in early childhood? ›

Self-expression, through being creative and playing with materials, encourages and supports children's imagination and thinking process development. It allows them to produce new understandings, experiencing the world from different perspectives.

How can creative expression help children articulate their feeling? ›

Creative expression offers children an opportunity to develop important skills that support positive social emotional health including the ability to name and identify their own feelings, think critically about the world around them and practice self-regulation for positive behavior management.

What influences creative expression? ›

Cultural factors clearly have a profound influence on appropriate outlets for creative expression, on the nature of the subject matter and form of expression, on the functions that various forms of expression serve, and on the types of individuals selected for, or engaged in, creative activity.

What are some ways to promote children's creative thinking and expression? ›

8 Ways to Encourage Creative Thinking in Children
  1. Make Children Question Things. ...
  2. Provide Opportunities to Express Their Intelligence. ...
  3. Teach Them Multiple Ways to Solve Every Problem. ...
  4. Trigger Their Curiosity. ...
  5. Engage Them With Activity Boxes. ...
  6. Encourage Children to Read for Pleasure. ...
  7. Give Them Free Time & Space.
16 Jul 2019

What activities promote creativity? ›

Here are ten tried and tested activities for charging up your creativity:
  • Take A Class. Learning something new is like giving your brain a vitamin boost. ...
  • Keep a Journal. ...
  • Use Your Commute. ...
  • Challenge Your Body. ...
  • Meditate. ...
  • Go to sleep. ...
  • Meet Someone New. ...
  • Organise Your Space.
13 Sept 2019

How do you promote expressions in the classroom? ›

How to Encourage Self Expression in Students
  1. Arts as a medium for expression. ...
  2. Talk to them about their feelings. ...
  3. Encourage exploration. ...
  4. Offer them choices. ...
  5. Let them develop their own style. ...
  6. Encourage them to write each day. ...
  7. Take them outdoors once in a while. ...
  8. Facilitate sport activities.
15 Jan 2022

How do you promote expressions in ECE? ›

How can you encourage expression?
  1. Reflect on how you generally communicate with your children. ...
  2. Remember that conversations with your child are a two-way street. ...
  3. Speak with program staff each day and learn more about your child's activities to gain more insight into how your child likes to express themselves.

How do you promote expressions in childcare? ›

Are you interested in learning about how to facilitate self-expression activities among children in your daycare center?
...
Activities
  1. Creative Movement.
  2. Dance.
  3. Dramatic Play.
  4. Drawing.
  5. Music Making.
  6. Painting.
  7. Puppet Play.
  8. Storytelling.

Why is creative arts important in early childhood? ›

By engaging in art activities, children practice a variety of skills and progress in all areas of development. Creative art helps children grow in physical, social, cognitive, and emotional development. Children also practice imagination and experimentation as they invent new ways to create art.

How creative expression can impact today's issues? ›

From a societal perspective, art can be a unifying force to decreasing social barriers and strengthening interpersonal connections. Creative expression also has the power to improve well-being by helping us understand ourselves and shifting perspectives that reinforce positive behaviors.

What is the role of the arts and creativity in early childhood education and care? ›

Children learn to express their ideas and imagination through art. It encourages them to experiment with unknown materials and use new methods and techniques to achieve their desired effect. This helps boost their self confidence and decision-making skills in the future.

How is creative expression linked to brain growth? ›

Creative play is important for healthy brain development

75 percent of the brain develops after a child is born, between birth and the early 20s. During this time, creative play stimulates the brain to develop connections between nerve cells.

What is the nature and purpose of creative expression? ›

The primary purpose of creative expression is to allow individuals to explore the many ways to discover and express their feelings, ideas, cultures, and values.

Why is creative expression important to culture? ›

Freedom of creative expression and ideas fosters an inclusive and innovative society. Arts and culture lift our souls, affirm our identity, create a sense of belonging, and develop an informed and compassionate society.

Videos

1. Give yourself permission to be creative | Ethan Hawke
(TED)
2. 30 Simple Art Techniques Everyone Can Do
(5-Minute Crafts PLAY)
3. May 2019- Program Quality and Alignment Subcommittee
(Colorado Department of Early Childhood)
4. Teaching art or teaching to think like an artist? | Cindy Foley | TEDxColumbus
(TEDx Talks)
5. How to speak so that people want to listen | Julian Treasure
(TED)
6. Tools for the Creative Life: Adaptation
(Denver Public Library)
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