Creative Curriculum Themes & Strategies | What is Creative Curriculum? - Video & Lesson Transcript | Study.com (2022)

Sumita Johnson, Clio Stearns
  • AuthorSumita Johnson

    Sumita Johnson has worked as an instructional design manager and a learning and development professional for more than 15 years. She has also taught English to Primary and high-school students. She has a Masters degree in English Literature. She also has numerous professional certificates, such as 150-hour TESOL Certificate, Gamification, TAA40104 in Training and Assessment, Online Course Facilitation and Diplomas in Neurolinguistic Programming (NLP) and Information Technology.

  • InstructorClio Stearns

    Clio has taught education courses at the college level and has a Ph.D. in curriculum and instruction.

Creative curriculum is a type of teaching methodology. Learn about creative curriculum themes and teaching strategies within the creative curriculum method. Updated: 12/27/2021

Table of Contents

  • What is Creative Curriculum?
  • Creative Curriculum Themes
  • Teaching Strategies for Creative Curricula
  • What are the Benefits of Creative Curriculum?
  • Lesson Summary
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What is Creative Curriculum?

A creative curriculum is one in which students learn concepts, terms, and ideas taught using creative strategies. This engages the learners and encourages self-discovery and continued interest. Students are hooked to the content and find out means to prolong their learning.

Not all classrooms have four walls

Creative Curriculum Themes & Strategies | What is Creative Curriculum? - Video & Lesson Transcript | Study.com (1)

When creativity is thought of, generally arts, painting, theatre, literature, etc. come to mind but while these subjects can form a part of a creative curriculum, the use of arts, theatre, and literature, and many other such creative strategies can enhance the outcome expected while teaching other subjects, such as history, geography, civics, biology, physics, chemistry, mathematics, trigonometry, etc. After all, in life, all subjects are related and are not bound in watertight compartments. For example, the water cycle can be taught using a range of engaging, creative activities and not just a test where they have to write what is a water cycle. Several science and nature experiments may be used to teach the concept of evaporation, condensation, precipitation, gravity, heat, cold, etc. This ensures that learning continues even after the lesson has finished at school.

Making a Curriculum Creative

Curriculum is the knowledge, skill, and concepts that children learn, implicitly as well as explicitly, as a result of direct instruction. Creativity is the use of innovation, enthusiasm, and individuality. So what do creativity and curriculum have to do with one another? Simply put, a creative curriculum is one in which students learn through creative and active teaching strategies. Creative curriculum gets beyond rote learning and focuses on big ideas, interesting projects, and individual students' passions and needs. Often when we think of creativity, we think about tangible art, such as literature and music. These things can be an important part of a creative curriculum, but just about every element of a curriculum can be approached creatively, from science to math to history.

A creative curriculum is all about focusing on big concepts or ideas. For example, let's say you're working on a science curriculum about plants and how they grow. It's important for students to learn the stages of photosynthesis. Depending on their age range, you may want students to memorize things such as what a plant needs to survive, or even different types of plants, or plant reproduction. But a creative curriculum isn't really about memorizing facts. Instead, a creative curriculum is one that is oriented toward what is conceptually important. Take a few minutes to jot down what concepts about plants you think might be important to the age group you work with. Some examples of big ideas might be things like:

  • Plants have things they need in order to survive.
  • Different plants grow in different places, and this happens for a reason.
  • There are different categories of plants.

Once you have pinpointed three to five big, abstract ideas that outline your curriculum, you will be better prepared to get creative with specific activities.

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Dance and The Performing Arts can be used as a great creative curriculum strategy to teach about Art and Culture

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Creative Curriculum Themes

A creative curriculum focuses on big ideas or concepts rather than the details. The process of self-discovery and engaging teaching methods encourages students to learn and reinforce the 'big ideas' and concepts. Furthermore, these big ideas or concepts help figure out the important ideas and those then give birth to smaller, creative curriculum units of study, topics or themes, and assignment ideas, not to mention interesting projects too.

For example, the concept of food is not just a matter of biology, it spans across subjects and grade levels. While at a lower-level grade, food and cooking vocabulary can be taught in English, the same grade can be taught how making the right food choices helps them keep fit, which could be a topic from a physical education class. The teacher can give them the task of documenting what they ate every day for two weeks in their food journals. The biology teacher can teach the same grade about the digestive system. An art teacher can get the same grade to make clay models and drawings of fruits, vegetables, common food items, etc.

At the higher-level grade, a biology teacher can teach all about the food pyramid and how the food pyramid changes according to various factors, such as gender, use of calories, dietary requirements, physical activity levels, body weight, etc. An English teacher could ask the same grade to invent recipes by providing a few ingredients and helping them get creative. They would be using complex sentence structures and a set of instructions. The use of proper vocabulary, tenses, and imperative structures can be tested at this level. A physical education teacher can have them create their diet chart and physical activity plan with a given set of requirements, like the use of calories and physical activities. Cooking competitions and tasting events can also be organized at the school.

These big ideas or creative curriculum themes are absolutely important to teach at all grade levels because in real life, too, the big ideas are interconnected. They don't pertain to any single 'subject.' Even after a lesson is over at school, students continue to learn through practice, observation, hands-on experiences, trial and error methods to keep engaging with these themes. For many, when they get passionately involved with these ideas, it converts into their career or vocation later on.

Teaching Strategies for Creative Curricula

While most schools require teachers to stick to a certain curriculum/textbook or standard, learning can be made fun if the strategies used to teach lessons are out of the box, novel, and engaging. There is a plethora of teaching strategies to choose from when it comes to making content engaging and 'sticky'. Moreover, students are highly creative, something that should not be ignored at school.

Learning need not end when the lesson ends. On the contrary, learning can continue each time the student makes a relevant reflective observation. Some of the teaching strategies that can be used in creative curricula are:

  • Science experiments
  • Nature walks and discussions
  • Hands-on projects
  • Debates and think tank models
  • Field trips and excursions
  • Jokes and humor
  • Songs and dance
  • Theatre and the performing arts
  • Guest speakers
  • Interviewing experts
  • Shadowing and modeling experts
  • Use of multimedia content and technology
  • Honing of individual passions and needs/talents

Making students grow their own plant in order to teach the concept of photosynthesis and many other processes is a great creative curriculum strategy

Creative Curriculum Themes & Strategies | What is Creative Curriculum? - Video & Lesson Transcript | Study.com (9)

What are the Benefits of Creative Curriculum?

Exams are not the end result or the objective of education. The prolonged retention of information and its application throughout life is. Exams are just one of the methods through which the results of learning can be demonstrated. But as most of the learning imparted encourages the rote method, the information is only retained in the short-term memory and soon forgotten.

Teaching history does not have to be constrained only to classrooms and textbooks and flipping through presentations. School excursions to historical monuments is an excellent creative curriculum strategy

Creative Curriculum Themes & Strategies | What is Creative Curriculum? - Video & Lesson Transcript | Study.com (10)

When curricula are taught using creative curriculum strategies, the outcome is far more than just getting a good grade in the exams and tests. It goes beyond the class. It transfers to real life. This helps students retain concepts. Creative curricula lessons are like planting a seed in the minds of students. The students are engaged even without the textbooks or teachers. They try and find out more information and engage in self-teaching. These concepts are then hardwired in the brain and understood in a fun, engaging way. The benefits of a creative curriculum include:

  • Increased engagement
  • Increased focus
  • Better understanding and comprehension
  • Prolonged retention of content
  • Encourages self-discovery
  • Encourages continued interest and learning
  • Possibility of getting converted into a passion or a vocation

Lesson Summary

A creative curriculum is where the concepts and the big ideas are taught using creative teaching strategies and engaging methods. This is a method apart from traditional teaching methods where memorization or role learning was encouraged. Memorization often takes the fun away from learning and reduces creativity. Many traditional teaching methods do not engage learners. All subjects can be taught using the creative curriculum, not just tangible subjects, such as the arts, theatre, and literature. Creativity has to do with novelty, innovation, engagement, and ideation.

Identifying the big ideas is important in curriculum planning because they help figure out what's most important about a curriculum. Once the big ideas are determined, they can be taught in many different ways, and by way of various subjects. Creative curriculum strategies have proved to be positive and effective teaching tools. While a teacher may be required to stick to a particular textbook or curriculum, learning can still be made fun if the strategies used to teach are engaging, creative, and innovative. Moreover, students are often creative. Having a guest speaker in the class, field trips, excursions, and other hands-on experiences are likely to engage students and constitute a creative curriculum.

Engaging Activities

A creative curriculum should include engaging activities that captivate students' attention and work to formulate an understanding of the big ideas. Of course, you could stand up in front of your students and lecture them about the attributes of plants. Or, you could get creative. Take them on a neighborhood walk and ask them to sketch and observe the plants they see. Borrow botanical guides from your school and local library. Build time into your lessons to go online and do virtual learning modules pertaining to plants. In general, the more varied activities you can incorporate into a unit of study, the more creative your curriculum will be. Varied activities will also appeal to and engage different types of learners.

If you have trouble coming up with ideas for activities, here are some starting points:

  • Get outside of your classroom or school building.
  • Incorporate art, music, and/or movement.
  • Incorporate dramatic role plays and other performances.
  • Invite guest experts, family members, or other outside speakers.
  • Incorporate technology in appropriate doses.

These guidelines can be great starting points for developing activities, whatever the topic you're exploring might be.

Creating Continuity

Remember that great curricula are tied together across units to create continuity, or connection to other units within the curriculum. In other words, when students finish studying plants, that doesn't mean plants should never come up in lessons again. Maybe a plant in your classroom is dying. Even though you have moved on to a study of weather systems, give your students an opportunity to access what they learned in your plant unit to help the dying plant. Ask students periodically if they are noticing anything about plants in the world around them.

(Video) Creative Wellbeing Classroom Activities

No matter what the topic of a curriculum, continuity makes it more creative and memorable. By showing students that the information and concepts they learn in school apply to different aspects of their lives, you are showing them the real importance of knowledge and passion. This will enable them to live full lives as creative and thoughtful individuals.

It might sometimes feel that your options for creativity are limited. You might be required to follow a set of standards or a textbook that leaves little room for creative expression. Don't worry, students' natural creativity is not easily suppressed. If you make just a little time each day for student's questions, ideas, and voices to be heard, you will find that they can bring creativity and joy to even the driest lesson plan.

Lesson Summary

A creative curriculum is one in which students learn through creative and active teaching strategies. Students taught a creative curriculum are more likely to be engaged and excited about learning. Creative curricula often include elements of traditionally creative fields, like art and music, but any subject can be taught using a creative curriculum. There are lots of different ways to teach creatively. A good starting point for developing a creative curriculum is to focus on the big ideas for the curriculum and the subject matter. Next, develop engaging activities designed to challenge the students' creativity, while learning the curriculum. Be sure to strive for continuity when planning one unit of the curriculum to the next, which ensures greater retention and creates meaningful connections between ideas.

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Making a Curriculum Creative

Curriculum is the knowledge, skill, and concepts that children learn, implicitly as well as explicitly, as a result of direct instruction. Creativity is the use of innovation, enthusiasm, and individuality. So what do creativity and curriculum have to do with one another? Simply put, a creative curriculum is one in which students learn through creative and active teaching strategies. Creative curriculum gets beyond rote learning and focuses on big ideas, interesting projects, and individual students' passions and needs. Often when we think of creativity, we think about tangible art, such as literature and music. These things can be an important part of a creative curriculum, but just about every element of a curriculum can be approached creatively, from science to math to history.

A creative curriculum is all about focusing on big concepts or ideas. For example, let's say you're working on a science curriculum about plants and how they grow. It's important for students to learn the stages of photosynthesis. Depending on their age range, you may want students to memorize things such as what a plant needs to survive, or even different types of plants, or plant reproduction. But a creative curriculum isn't really about memorizing facts. Instead, a creative curriculum is one that is oriented toward what is conceptually important. Take a few minutes to jot down what concepts about plants you think might be important to the age group you work with. Some examples of big ideas might be things like:

  • Plants have things they need in order to survive.
  • Different plants grow in different places, and this happens for a reason.
  • There are different categories of plants.

Once you have pinpointed three to five big, abstract ideas that outline your curriculum, you will be better prepared to get creative with specific activities.

Engaging Activities

A creative curriculum should include engaging activities that captivate students' attention and work to formulate an understanding of the big ideas. Of course, you could stand up in front of your students and lecture them about the attributes of plants. Or, you could get creative. Take them on a neighborhood walk and ask them to sketch and observe the plants they see. Borrow botanical guides from your school and local library. Build time into your lessons to go online and do virtual learning modules pertaining to plants. In general, the more varied activities you can incorporate into a unit of study, the more creative your curriculum will be. Varied activities will also appeal to and engage different types of learners.

If you have trouble coming up with ideas for activities, here are some starting points:

  • Get outside of your classroom or school building.
  • Incorporate art, music, and/or movement.
  • Incorporate dramatic role plays and other performances.
  • Invite guest experts, family members, or other outside speakers.
  • Incorporate technology in appropriate doses.

These guidelines can be great starting points for developing activities, whatever the topic you're exploring might be.

Creating Continuity

Remember that great curricula are tied together across units to create continuity, or connection to other units within the curriculum. In other words, when students finish studying plants, that doesn't mean plants should never come up in lessons again. Maybe a plant in your classroom is dying. Even though you have moved on to a study of weather systems, give your students an opportunity to access what they learned in your plant unit to help the dying plant. Ask students periodically if they are noticing anything about plants in the world around them.

No matter what the topic of a curriculum, continuity makes it more creative and memorable. By showing students that the information and concepts they learn in school apply to different aspects of their lives, you are showing them the real importance of knowledge and passion. This will enable them to live full lives as creative and thoughtful individuals.

It might sometimes feel that your options for creativity are limited. You might be required to follow a set of standards or a textbook that leaves little room for creative expression. Don't worry, students' natural creativity is not easily suppressed. If you make just a little time each day for student's questions, ideas, and voices to be heard, you will find that they can bring creativity and joy to even the driest lesson plan.

Lesson Summary

A creative curriculum is one in which students learn through creative and active teaching strategies. Students taught a creative curriculum are more likely to be engaged and excited about learning. Creative curricula often include elements of traditionally creative fields, like art and music, but any subject can be taught using a creative curriculum. There are lots of different ways to teach creatively. A good starting point for developing a creative curriculum is to focus on the big ideas for the curriculum and the subject matter. Next, develop engaging activities designed to challenge the students' creativity, while learning the curriculum. Be sure to strive for continuity when planning one unit of the curriculum to the next, which ensures greater retention and creates meaningful connections between ideas.

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What is the creative curriculum approach?

The creative curriculum approach is when creative teaching methods and strategies are used to teach a concept or a subject. The goal of learning is not to only pass a test but to ensure that concepts are understood beyond the test. Using effective tools, such as creative curriculum strategies, cements lesson concepts in a manner where learning lasts forever.

What are the key components of creative curriculum?

The key components of creative curriculum entail using various strategies, such as art, theatre, performing arts, field trips and school excursions, guest lectures, observation and reflection, experiments, nature walks, and use of multimedia.

What is the benefit of creative curriculum?

There are several benefits of creative curriculum, such as increased engagement, increased focus, better understanding and comprehension, and prolonged retention of content.

What theory is creative curriculum based on?

Creative curriculum is based on the fact that learning should be made relevant to students' everyday lives. Subjects are never isolated in watertight compartments, but rather interconnected and interdependent. Hence, in real life when a child sees the rain, the concepts taught through various subjects are practiced, learned, and reinforced.

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At a young age, children’s learning and development are greatly influenced by their surroundings, their relationships, and how they are taught to learn. At this stage in life, it is important for children to feed their own curiosities and learn at their own pace, in their own way. The Creative Curriculum and the Teaching Strategies […]

At a young age, children’s learning and development are greatly influenced by their surroundings, their relationships, and how they are taught to learn.. The Creative Curriculum and the Teaching Strategies GOLD® help teach children to be independent in their learning and allow the teachers to evaluate the pace and style at which a child learns and accommodate for that.. At Yellow Brick Road Early Childhood Development Center, we implement the Creative Curriculum to help guide children through activities based on children’s interests.. During these early years of a child’s life, they learn about letters and numbers, learn how to write and speak, and will learn how to use language in everyday life.. At Yellow Brick Road, children will have time to throughout the day to explore different learning material, engage with other students, and participate in activities that focus on all of the areas above, helping them to develop better skills.. Teachers will learn about each child, observing them and learning what interests them, how they learn best, and providing children with the right material and activities to continue learning.

The types of curriculum consist of policies and requirements by federal and state entities. There are typically seven types. Curriculum models and approaches establish student learning. School districts implement changes in curriculum to improve teaching quality and student performance.

Aside from having seven types of curriculum helping teachers in the classroom, the learning styles and experiences also influence how students learn.. Many school districts also offer curriculum experts or designers to develop written curriculums.. In a taught curriculum, teachers use various types of learning tools for teaching.. For example, group work or a lab experiment is part of the taught curriculum since students engage in learning the material based on the teacher’s delivery of the lesson.. As part of the taught curriculum, teachers also implement learning styles into the lessons in order to satisfy different special needs for learning.. While many of these types of curriculum support the teacher in the classroom, evaluation of the learning consists of the assessed and learned curriculum.. Although it is not intended to be part of the curriculum or is not planned, the hidden curriculum encourages students and teachers to address cultural and background issues that are currently affecting education and the community.. This learning experience is a theoretical approach to teaching, using project-based learning, community-based learning and authentic learning.. In this way, curriculum experts investigate the different models of curriculum in order to stimulate neural pathways in students.. As developers of the curriculum, teachers consider how to approach student learning and how it will serve the school.. Other models of the curriculum include how the educational experiences correlate with student learning and the organizational systems available to create an effective curriculum.. Much like Tyler in 1949, who proposed to define curriculum as a development of education, current school districts attempt to modify the curriculum development in order to meet present-day issues.. While the models of curriculum are more scientifically driven than in previous years, curriculum development needs a more awakening approach to discuss the learning experiences of students outside and inside the classroom.. Similarly, a null curriculum, as the term implies, is not explicitly present in teaching methods, but the consequences of learning it may have a powerful impact on student learning and their experiences and perception.. Indeed, a null curriculum allows students to piece together what they know with what they learn in school, under guidance from the teacher.

Get help on 【 Creative Curriculum 】 on Graduateway ✅ A huge assortment of FREE essays & assignments ✅ Find an idea for your paper!

The Creative Curriculum Framework is composed of How Children Learn, What Children Learn, The Parent’s Role, The Physical Environment, The Teacher’s Role and the different learning areas.. Each classroom should be conducive to learning that each learner may feel comfortable to stay, explore, select, play, learn and get involved to every activity that is present and that is possible by having a complete learning areas and the materials that it should contain.. There are things that only parents know about their child that’s why it is essential that the teacher and the parents have the so called partnership for the effectiveness of the program that will deal with the needs of the child and that learning and growth will maintain even at home and also because of this partnership the teacher and the parents could have a pleasant relationship.. Parental inputs are considered by the teacher as the first fundamental part of information in the screening process of each child and the teacher will be the one who will inform the development or the problem that their child have.. And through this areas, children can work successfully in small groups; it will also help children to share and take turns by first providing duplicates of materials and then using waiting lists or timers so children have a concrete way of knowing when they will have a turn; it can also help children work through disputes so they can learn skill in egotiating and problem solving.. Three Schemes | Regular Curriculum| Modified Curriculum| Special Curriculum| Target Students| Regular School Children| Regular School Children with Special Needs| Children with Special Needs aimed primarily at developing adoptive skills to maximize their potential| Curriculum Contents| * Minimum Learning Competencies (MLCs) that are given by the Department of Education (DepEd) for all grade levels.. K+12 Curriculum| * K+12 Curriculum| * Individualized Instruction| Programs Included| * Multigrade Class * Regular Classroom Teacher| * Sensory Training * Special Instruction in Braille reading and writing * Mathematics * Orientation and mobility training * Braille music, and * Typing| * Integration/ Mainstreaming * Resource Room Plan * Itinerant Teacher Plan * Cooperative Class Plan * Special Class Plan * SPED Center * Special Day School * Residential School * Hospital Instruction * Homebound Instruction * Community-Based Delivery System|

New to teaching and wondering what a curriculum is? Learn what that term means, how it's used, and how you can build a curriculum yourself!

Essential Resources : What will you use to teach your class and what will students use to learn?. Your class’s essential resources include anything you need for your students to teach everything in your class.. So when you use lecture, online learning, and textbooks to teach your students, you’re technically teaching with blended learning!. By practicing blended learning, you acknowledge these differences in your students’ learning preferences and create ways to help all of your students learn.. Cooperative learning is the practice of creating small groups of students in your class and having them teach one another.. That’s why so many health science and computer applications classes have strict standards — every class in the state needs to teach the same fundamental information for students to succeed later in life!. Your capstone project is the final assessment of your class that you use to gauge how much students have learned throughout the marking period.

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This article looks at the benefits of using creative approaches to build a curriculum that meets the requirements of the statutory curriculum, raises standards and engages and enthuses children.. It’s important that children learn what’s in the statutory curriculum, but most teachers know that children need much more than this.. Balancing children’s needs with the statutory curriculum will always be a challenge, but instead of the two acting in opposition we can ensure the content of the curriculum meets the needs of children and fulfils statutory requirements.. The statutory curriculum – what we have to cover in our schools – is set out in curriculum 2000.. The planning for how the curriculum is to be delivered is key to engaging and inspiring children.. By planning a ‘skeleton’ theme based on our curriculum map, we ensure educational purpose, but the content needs also to be steered by children.. Most worryingly, though, asking children what they want to learn may lead to a situation that keeps children in a world that they’ve already experienced and not into the new worlds teachers can take children based on their needs rather than their wants.. Planning for the breadth of study in the National Curriculum has been addressed by creating your curriculum map.

Contents: introduction · curriculum as transmission · curriculum as product · curriculum as process · curriculum as praxis · curriculum and context · curriculum and informal education · further reading · links · how to cite this article

Curriculum as process We have seen that the curriculum as product model is heavily dependent on the setting of behavioural objectives.. He defined curriculum tentatively: ‘A curriculum is an attempt to communicate the essential principles and features of an educational proposal in such a form that it is open to critical scrutiny and capable of effective translation into practice’.. More specifically, if curriculum is process then the word curriculum is redundant because process would do very nicely!. Rather than tightly specifying behavioural objectives and methods in advance, what happens in this model of curriculum theory and practice is that content and means develop as teachers and students work together.. A process approach to curriculum theory and practice, it is argued by writers like Grundy (1987), tends towards making the process of learning the central concern of the teacher.. Curriculum as praxis Curriculum as praxis is, in many respects, a development of the process model.. Curriculum as the boundary between formal and informal education Jeffs and Smith (1990; 1999) have argued that the notion of curriculum provides a central dividing line between formal and informal education.. However, process and praxis models of curriculum also present problems in the context of informal education.. In a number of respects these different bodies of curriculum theory and practice link to the four main forces in North American curriculum-making in the twentieth century: the liberal educators; the scientific curriculum makers; the developmental/person-centred; and the social meliorists (those that sought more radical social change) (after Kliebart 1987).. The movement between mental discipline, child centredness, scientific curriculum making (Taylorism) and social meliorism provides a very helpful set of insights into the theory and process of curriculum making within adult education.. Reviews different models of curriculum theory and practice (largely US) and assesses some specific areas of practice such as continuing professional education and literacy education.. Chapters explore the nature of the curriculum problem; the content of education; teaching; the school as an institution; behavioural objectives and curriculum development; a critique of the objectives model; the process model; evaluation; a research model of curriculum development; the teacher as researcher; and the school and innovation.

Chris Fenton enthuses about the possibilities of reintegrating the curriculum, and making it more creative and relevant to children

The relative rigidity of the former curriculum can often provide this since such schools know that they are covering what is expected of them and can use the evidence they are gathering to help to build on progress and plan for change.. For, in its very essence, the creative curriculum is allowing schools to regain ownership of their curricula and, against a backdrop of standards, use their collective experience, understanding, professionalism and creativity to start again at the beginning.. The only place to start when taking on such a far reaching sense of change within a school is through the identification of a clearly constituted plan for change.. Initial consultations on what the school would like to achieve and the type of school they would like to be are the obvious starting point.. Since child-centred learning lies at the heart of what is on offer in order for schools to successfully ascertain how to achieve this, they must first look within themselves and find what their school ethos truly is.. A curriculum based around the needs and expectations of all school stakeholders, under the umbrella of an agreed ethos, can enhance the individuality of a school and create a ‘feel’ that is utterly unique to it.. The freedom that comes with the creative curriculum gives an opportunity for schools to begin redefining themselves.. Therefore, if school leaders are to be successful in demonstrating success in this area they need to remove the idea that this significant change is a threatening event and should reduce the possibilities of developing stress symptoms in staff by encouraging them to work collectively in creating their fantasy curriculum and nurturing enthusiasm from there.. A recent example of blending the creative curriculum way of thinking into schools slowly was to invite teachers within key stages to plan a half term’s work around an agreed question.. The need for rigidity in measuring standards of teaching and learning are obvious, and school self-evaluation needs to form the basis of any changes taking place; however, learners learn in different ways and if the creative curriculum is inspiring teachers and leaders to consider how they help learners to achieve then any form of internal or external scrutiny should identify that children are learning because of enthusiasm and originality in the methods of teaching and the curriculum being taught.. As QCA and local authorities begin the process of explanation and offering advice on how to achieve the expectations on offer, schools and leaders need to be addressing the farther reaching elements of their curriculum.. Similarly, the ever approaching statutory nature of the citizenship curriculum and personal finance education can both be served through a broad, balanced and creative curriculum.. The many awards and recognitions available to schools such as the Eco-School Award and the Healthy Schools Partnership can be inputted into creative planning so as to make their expectations a standard part of the curriculum.. Explicit links between subjects and making them relevant to the personal communities of schools, with significant links to an understanding of our place within the world, can and will bring the curriculum alive, but only if it is a well managed process of change management that embraces the views of all concerned.. The creative curriculum and the opportunities it brings will not create a generation of super humans, nor will it take place overnight, but it will increase the chances of pupils regarding education as something to be enjoyed, a fact that will lead to a greater understanding of the possibilities available to them as they become the adults leading us forward.

There are several types of curriculum design; here are definitions and tips for educators to use to design curriculum to improve student learning.

Curriculum design is a term used to describe the purposeful, deliberate, and systematic organization of curriculum (instructional blocks) within a class or course.. In other words, it is a way for teachers to plan instruction .. Teachers design each curriculum with a specific educational purpose in mind.. Subject-centered design Learner-centered design Problem-centered design. Developing differentiated instruction puts pressure on the teacher to create instruction and/or find materials that are conducive to each student's learning needs.. Like learner-centered curriculum design, problem-centered curriculum design is also a form of student-centered design.. This data might include what learners already know and what they need to know to be proficient in a particular area or skill.. Learning goals are the things teachers want students to achieve in the course.. Consider creating a curriculum map (also known as a curriculum matrix) so that you can properly evaluate the sequence and coherence of instruction.. Identify the instructional methods that will be used throughout the course and consider how they will work with student learning styles.. Examples of things that should be evaluated include the strengths and weaknesses of the curriculum and achievement rates related to learning outcomes.

The Marquette University Child Care Center uses the principles from the Creative Curriculum of six main theorists.

The Creative Curriculum includes developmentally appropriate goals and objectives for children within four main categories of interest: social/emotional, physical, cognitive and language.. The cognitive stage is associated with thinking skills.. Knowing children — describes the social/emotional, physical, cognitive and language development of children Creating a responsive environment — offers a model for setting up the physical environment for routines and experiences in ways that address the developing abilities and interests of children What children are learning — shows how the responsive relationship you form with each child, the interactions you have every day, and the materials and experiences you offer become the building blocks for successful learning Caring and teaching — describes the varied and interrelated roles of teachers who work with children Building partnerships with families — explores the benefits of working with families as partners in the care of their children. As teachers, we need to: Provide many and varied experiences for children Allow children time to practice new skills Develop positive relationships with each child Create a safe environment where children can explore confidently and learn Provide many rich language experiences throughout the day by describing what is happening, asking questions, singing and reading Offer continuity of care. Picture and word labels are on containers and shelves so children know where materials belong and learn to use print.. There are distinct interest areas: blocks, dramatic play, toys and games, art, discovery, library, sand and water, music and movement, cooking, computers, and different outdoor play spaces so children know what choices are available and can make decisions.. Teachers, staff and parents must communicate and share ideas so the child’s interests are best met.. Through those notes, we can plan activities that interest them but still teach skill building within the four stages.. Build a trusting relationship with each child Provide responsive, individualized care Create environments that support and encourage exploration Ensure children’s safety and health Develop partnerships with families Observe and document children’s development in order to plan for each child and the group Recognize the importance of social/emotional development Appreciate cultural, family and individual differences Take advantage of every opportunity to build a foundation for lifelong learning Support dual-language learners Include children with disabilities in all aspects of the program

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Going through this process has meant that, alongside the curriculum document, teachers (and subject leaders) have a clear understanding of which skills to include within schemes of work, and how these skills are developed throughout children’s time at school.. We wanted children to be given the opportunity to work in different ways.. Drawing on the brilliant work of Dorothy Heathcote and the Mantle of the Expert (mantleoftheexpert.com), the challenge is created to draw children into a fictional or fantasy world.. Our homes were set alight, our crops destroyed, and the tools from my workshop were stolen.I am fearful that they may return and feel unable to protect my wife Beatrix and our two young children.. Being able to identify and then care about the long-term goals of the client will create an environment in which the children are able to develop their role as experts in running the enterprise.. Whilst there may be other smaller challenges presented along the way, these opening questions help children to become immersed in their work.. Environment – how are we going to resource or restrict the environment to provide direction for the children’s investigation of this time period?. With a healthy balance between direct teaching and child-led learning, the children will deepen both their historical knowledge and understanding, and their immersion in the fictional enterprise.. As the topic progresses and the children develop and reflect on their learning, they will arrive at the point where they can begin to rebuild Algar’s village.. As a final twist to the Anglo-Saxon topic, we could return to the original letter from Algar and remind the children about the following line: ‘I am fearful that they may return…’

The term curriculum refers to the lessons and academic content taught in a school or in a specific course or program. In dictionaries, curriculum is often defined as the courses offered by a school, but it is rarely used in such a general sense in schools. Depending on how broadly educators define or employ the term, curriculum typically […]

An individual teacher’s curriculum, for example, would be the specific learning standards, lessons, assignments, and materials used to organize and teach a particular course.. Standards requirements: When new learning standards are adopted at the state, district, or school levels, teachers typically modify what they teach and bring their curriculum into “ alignment ” with the learning expectations outlined in the new standards.. Curriculum alignment: Schools may try to improve curriculum quality by bringing teaching activities and course expectations into “ alignment ” with learning standards and other school courses—a practice sometimes called “curriculum mapping.” The basic idea is to create a more consistent and coherent academic program by making sure that teachers teach the most important content and eliminate learning gaps that may exist between sequential courses and grade levels.. Districts may purchase all three programs or an individual school may purchase only one, and the programs may be offered to all or only some of the students in a school.. Curriculum standardization: States, districts, and schools may also try to improve teaching quality and effectiveness by requiring, or simply encouraging, teachers to use either a standardized curriculum or common processes for developing curriculum.

This chapter contains an introduction to curriculum differentiation for students with exceptional learning abilities, descriptions and examples of 30 strategies to differentiate learning experiences for them. A description of each strategy is followed by a list of behaviors that indicate it is needed. Examples and resources are also provided. The ideas presented here are based on the work of Maker & Nielson in Curriculum Development and Teaching Strategies for Gifted Learners.[1]

This chapter contains an introduction to curriculum differentiation for students with exceptional learning abilities, descriptions and examples of 30 strategies to differentiate learning experiences for them.. Tomlinson [3] defined curriculum differentiation for all students as “ensuring that what a student learns, how he/she learns, and how the student demonstrates what he/she has learned is a match for that student’s readiness level, interests, and preferred mode of learning.” This implies a commitment to accommodating individual learner characteristics.. That commitment is also evident in the sets of principles of high quality curriculum for general and gifted education Hockett [4] derived from general and gifted education literature (see Figure 1).. Flexibility “to account for student differences,” a theme common to high quality curriculum in both general and gifted education, is operationalized in practice as curriculum differentiation.. The principles for general education (left circle in Figure 4.1.1) are appropriate for students identified as gifted, however, they need to be adjusted to respond to the capacities that distinguish the learning of students with high ability.. It is those differences that distinguish curricula differentiated for high ability learners from curriculum differentiated to respond to the needs of students with less ability.. Differences in ability result in differences in what and how much is learned from appropriately differentiated learning experiences.. Every learning activity in a curriculum is composed of four elements: content, process, product and learning environment.. Learning Environment: The environment in which students learn has physical and psychological features can be enhanced to increase the benefits of differentiating the contents, processes and products learning.. Content Abstractness. Complexity. Extracurricular topics. Lives & living. [Re-]Organization for learning value. Real-life topics. Self-selected content Process Complex thinking. Expert methods of inquiry. Individual pursuits. Inquiry-based learning. Open-ended experiences. Flexible pacing. Reflecting & debriefing. Self-selected process. Variety Product Authentic audiences. Feedback & evaluation. Self-selected products. Transformations. Variety Learning Environment Accepting. Complex. Flexible. High mobility. Independent. Learner-centered. Open. Flexible groupings The seven content -related strategies focus on “concepts, ideas, strategies, images and information” [10] in curricula.. The nine process -oriented strategies focus on “the way educators teach and the ways students use information.” [11] They include methods involving inductive teaching and learning, higher levels of thinking, open-endedness, discovery, evidence of reasoning, choice, group interaction, pacing, and the variety of processes used.. The five outcome-oriented principles address “the nature of products expected of students” [12] when students demonstrate what they’ve learned.. They recommend learning outcomes address real problems, problem finding, elements of communication, features of evaluation, transformation of content from one form to another, variety of products developed, self-selection of product format and direction of students to real audiences.. The eight principles related to the learning environment recommend that it is learner-centered (vs. teacher-centered), independent (vs. dependent), open (vs. closed), accepting (vs. judging), complex (vs. simple), flexible (vs. rigid); involves varied groupings (vs. similar groupings) and high student mobility (vs. low).

Videos

1. Lesson Video Teaching Demonstration - Creative Writing | Danes Guhiting
(STUDENT INTERN DANES GUHITING)
2. Creative Strategies for ELA Standards
(McGraw Hill PreK-12)
3. Elements of Dance | KQED Arts
(KQED Art School)
4. Enhancing the Instructional Program with Creative Arts
(Institute of Education Sciences)
5. Teaching academic concepts through dance | Adrienne Clancy | TEDxMidAtlantic
(TEDx Talks)
6. We All Have Mental Health
(Anna Freud NCCF)

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