Docker + Consul + Vault: A Practical Guide (2022)

There are many resources ([1], [2], [3]) explaining how to use Vault, but none of them goes into the details of setting it up, especially alongise Consul and docker-compose.

I’m not going into the details of Vault and Consul in this blog post, but, for anyone not familiar with the concepts, let’s just say they are open source tools created by Hashicorp for managing secrets, and for simplifying service discovery, respectively.

The complete setup described in this blog post can be found on Github: https://github.com/marco-lancini/docker_vault.

The Use Case

As a security professional, I often find myself performing assessments of different systems, regardless if they are web/mobile applications, or entire infrastructures. Working in a team, one of the issues we often face is how to share credentials securely among the team members. Credentials managers like KeePass are awesome, but they haven’t been designed for collaboration, and those databases are painful to share and keep up-to-date between all the team members.

That’s where Consul comes handy: ideally we would like to quickly spin up a new instance for every assessment, so to handle password management across the team.

(Video) Spring Cloud Integration with HashiCorp Vault and Consul

The Setup

Here is the idea:

  • we want to spin up a vault server;
  • which in turn uses consul as a backend storage;
  • and, since we are lazy (and we don’t want to keep messing with the command line), we want to interface with the vault server with a handy web interface (vault-ui);
  • all automagically managed by docker-compose.

After a couple of afternoons spent delving into the documentation of the different services, I came up with the following setup:

$ tree docker_compose_vault.├── _data├── _scripts│ ├── backup.sh│ ├── clean.sh│ ├── setup.sh│ └── unseal.sh├── backup│ └── Dockerfile├── config│ ├── admin.hcl│ └── vault.hcl└── docker-compose.yml

Let’s start by dissecting the docker-compose file:

$ cat docker-compose.ymlversion: '2'services: consul: container_name: consul image: consul:latest ports: - "8500:8500" - "8300:8300" volumes: - ./config:/config - ./_data/consul:/data command: agent -server -data-dir=/data -bind 0.0.0.0 -client 0.0.0.0 -bootstrap-expect=1 vault: container_name: vault image: vault links: - consul:consul depends_on: - consul ports: - "8200:8200" volumes_from: - consul cap_add: - IPC_LOCK command: server -config=/config/vault.hcl webui: container_name: webui image: djenriquez/vault-ui ports: - "8000:8000" links: - vault:vault environment: NODE_TLS_REJECT_UNAUTHORIZED: 0 VAULT_URL_DEFAULT: https://vault:8200 backup: container_name: backup build: backup/ links: - consul:consul volumes: - ./_data/backup:/backup/ command: consul-backup
  • First of all, we define a consul service using the consul:latest image provided by Docker Hub. We then expose ports 8500 and 8300. We also specify 2 volumes: config for any configuration file we might need, and /data to provide persistent storage that can survive the container (I specified the local folder ./_data/consul, but you can make it point to a folder of your choosing). Finally, we start the agent in -server (not debug!) mode, specifying the container’s /data folder as the directory where to store the data (this mirrors what we defined in the volumes section).

  • Second service is the vault server, based on the vault image provided by Docker Hub. We provide some links to the consul service, from which it is dependant, then we expose port 8200. We then have to instruct to use the volumes defined for the consul service. Finally, we start the server passing the configuration stored in the vault.hcl file.

    (Video) Webinar: Securing Service Mesh with Kubernetes, Consul and Vault

$ cat config/vault.hclbackend "consul" { address = "consul:8500" advertise_addr = "http://consul:8300" scheme = "http"}listener "tcp" { address = "0.0.0.0:8200" #tls_cert_file = "/config/server.crt" #tls_key_file = "/config/server.key" tls_disable = 1}disable_mlock = true
# cat backup/DockerfileFROM golang# Get DependenciesRUN go get -v github.com/hashicorp/consul/apiRUN go get -v github.com/docopt/docopt-go# Build consul-backupRUN git clone https://github.com/kailunshi/consul-backup.gitRUN cd consul-backup && go build && cp consul-backup /bin/# InitializeRUN mkdir -p /backupWORKDIR /backup

In Action

Now that we have everything ready, let’s start by bootstrapping our setup with docker-compose up:

$ docker-compose upCreating network "dockercomposevault_default" with the default driverCreating consul ...Creating consul ... doneCreating backup ...Creating vault ...Creating backupCreating vault ... doneCreating webui ...Creating webui ... doneAttaching to consul, vault, webui, backupconsul | BootstrapExpect is set to 1; this is the same as Bootstrap mode.consul | bootstrap = true: do not enable unless necessaryvault | ==> Vault server configuration:vault |vault | Cgo: disabledconsul | ==> Starting Consul agent...vault | Cluster Address: https://consul:8301vault | Listener 1: tcp (addr: "0.0.0.0:8200", cluster address: "0.0.0.0:8201", tls: "disabled")vault | Log Level:vault | Mlock: supported: true, enabled: falsevault | Redirect Address: http://consul:8300vault | Storage: consul (HA available)vault | Version: Vault v0.9.1vault | Version Sha: 87b6919dea55da61d7cd444b2442cabb8ede8ab1vault |vault | ==> Vault server started! Log data will stream in below:vault |consul | ==> Consul agent running!consul | Version: 'v1.0.2'consul | Node ID: 'fef72b0a-2561-2e3c-725c-127373c452b6'consul | Node name: '4d4a6ed4951e'consul | Datacenter: 'dc1' (Segment: '<all>')consul | Server: true (Bootstrap: true)consul | Client Addr: [0.0.0.0] (HTTP: 8500, HTTPS: -1, DNS: 8600)consul | Cluster Addr: 172.19.0.2 (LAN: 8301, WAN: 8302)consul | Encrypt: Gossip: false, TLS-Outgoing: false, TLS-Incoming: falseconsul |consul | ==> Log data will now stream in as it occurs:webui | yarn run v1.2.1webui | $ nodemon ./server.js start_appwebui | [nodemon] 1.12.1webui | [nodemon] to restart at any time, enter `rs`webui | [nodemon] watching: *.*webui | [nodemon] starting `node ./server.js start_app`webui | Vault UI listening on: 8000

The 4 services are up and running, but we still need to initialize and unseal our vault. I scripted this in the setup.sh file, which will:

  1. Initialize the vault, and save the root and unseal keys in the keys.txt file
  2. Unseal the vault with the keys provided
  3. Authenticate to the server using the vault’s root token
  4. Enable username/password authentication, and create a user to be used by the webui (in this case: “webui/webui”)
  5. Create an authentication token to be used by the backup service (backup_token)
  6. List the secret backends and add a new backend for our assessment, with a dummy entry server1_ad
$ cat ./_scripts/setup.sh## CONFIG LOCAL ENVecho "[*] Config local environment..."alias vault='docker-compose exec vault vault "[emailprotected]"'export VAULT_ADDR=http://127.0.0.1:8200## INIT VAULTecho "[*] Init vault..."vault init -address=${VAULT_ADDR} > ./_data/keys.txtexport VAULT_TOKEN=$(grep 'Initial Root Token:' ./_data/keys.txt | awk '{print substr($NF, 1, length($NF)-1)}')## UNSEAL VAULTecho "[*] Unseal vault..."vault unseal -address=${VAULT_ADDR} $(grep 'Key 1:' ./_data/keys.txt | awk '{print $NF}')vault unseal -address=${VAULT_ADDR} $(grep 'Key 2:' ./_data/keys.txt | awk '{print $NF}')vault unseal -address=${VAULT_ADDR} $(grep 'Key 3:' ./_data/keys.txt | awk '{print $NF}')## AUTHecho "[*] Auth..."vault auth -address=${VAULT_ADDR} ${VAULT_TOKEN}## CREATE USERecho "[*] Create user... Remember to change the defaults!!"vault auth-enable -address=${VAULT_ADDR} userpassvault policy-write -address=${VAULT_ADDR} admin ./config/admin.hclvault write -address=${VAULT_ADDR} auth/userpass/users/webui password=webui policies=admin## CREATE BACKUP TOKENecho "[*] Create backup token..."vault token-create -address=${VAULT_ADDR} -display-name="backup_token" | awk '/token/{i++}i==2' | awk '{print "backup_token: " $2}' >> ./_data/keys.txt## MOUNTSecho "[*] Creating new mount point..."vault mounts -address=${VAULT_ADDR}vault mount -address=${VAULT_ADDR} -path=assessment -description="Secrets used in the assessment" genericvault write -address=${VAULT_ADDR} assessment/server1_ad value1=name value2=pwd

After running this script we should have your vault unsealed, a set of credentials (“webui/webui”) that can be used to login in the webui, and an authentication token to be used by the backup service.

(Video) Introduction to HashiCorp Consul

Once done, we can use docker-compose down to stop the services, while all our secrets will be stored in the _data/consul folder:

$ tree docker_compose_vault.├── README.md├── _data│ ├── backup│ └── consul│ ├── checkpoint-signature│ ├── checks│ │ ├── cadcd9b286711802922b3d3108ff1ffa│ │ └── state│ │ └── cadcd9b286711802922b3d3108ff1ffa│ ├── node-id│ ├── raft│ │ ├── peers.info│ │ ├── raft.db│ │ └── snapshots│ ├── serf│ │ ├── local.snapshot│ │ └── remote.snapshot│ └── services│ └── bf3c3c78519c4b4f52cace04789f79ab├── _scripts│ ├── backup.sh│ ├── clean.sh│ ├── setup.sh│ └── unseal.sh├── backup│ └── Dockerfile├── config│ ├── admin.hcl│ └── vault.hcl└── docker-compose.yml

Next time docker-compose is started, we will only have to unseal the vault, with the unseal.sh script:

$ cat _scripts/unseal.sh## CONFIG LOCAL ENVecho "[*] Config local environment..."alias vault='docker-compose exec vault vault "[emailprotected]"'export VAULT_ADDR=http://127.0.0.1:8200## UNSEAL VAULTecho "[*] Unseal vault..."vault unseal -address=${VAULT_ADDR} $(grep 'Key 1:' ./_data/keys.txt | awk '{print $NF}')vault unseal -address=${VAULT_ADDR} $(grep 'Key 2:' ./_data/keys.txt | awk '{print $NF}')vault unseal -address=${VAULT_ADDR} $(grep 'Key 3:' ./_data/keys.txt | awk '{print $NF}')

vault-ui

We could stop here and manage our secrets via the command line, or we could streamline the process a little bit more.Just open a browser and point it to http://127.0.0.1:8000. You should be presented with a login page. Insert the credentials and you’ll be able to manage your vault through a convenient web interface.

Docker + Consul + Vault: A Practical Guide (1)

Docker + Consul + Vault: A Practical Guide (2)

(Video) How to deploy Vault for Kubernetes in 2022 and inject secrets

Backup & Cleanup

At the end of the engagement, we might want to backup our secrets, and remove any leftovers file.

The backup service, based on the consul-backup script, will store the backup on the volume we specified in the docker-compose.yml file (_data/backup in this case).

$ cat _scripts/backup.shecho "[*] Executing backup..."docker-compose run backup consul-backup -i consul:8500 -t $(grep 'backup_token:' ./_data/keys.txt | awk -v RS='\r\n' '{printf $2}') backup_$(date +%Y-%m-%d)
$ ./_scripts/backup.sh[*] Executing backup...Starting consul ... donemap[--aclbackupfile:acl.bkp --restore:false <filename>:backup_2017-12-25 --help:false --version:false --address:consul:8500 --token:763743c6-2f8e-a8e1-ee84-da6d903b7c71 --aclbackup:false]Backup mode:KV store will be backed up to file: backup_2017-12-25$ tree docker_compose_vault.├── README.md├── _data│ ├── backup│ │ └── backup_2017-12-25│ ├── consul│ │ ├── checkpoint-signature...

Finally, the clean.sh script can be used to remove any data stored by the scripts or Consul in the _data folder (remember to move any backup file first!)

$ cat _scripts/clean.shread -p "[?] Are you sure you want to remove all Vault's data (y/n)? " answercase ${answer:0:1} in y|Y ) echo "[*] Removing files..." echo "[+] Removing: ./_data/consul/" rm -rf ./_data/consul/ echo "[+] Removing: ./_data/backup/" rm -rf ./_data/backup/ echo "[+] Removing: ./_data/keys.txt" rm -f ./_data/keys.txt ;; * ) echo "[*] Aborting..." ;;esac

Improvements

The setup described in this blog post should be enough to bring anyone up and running with Vault, but it could still be improved.

For example, I have disabled TLS. To re-enable it, just put the server’s certificate in the config folder and uncomment the relevant lines already put in the config\vault.hcl configuration file.

(Video) How To Setup Hashicorp Vault: Getting Started

Cheatsheet

WhatSteps
First Run1. Start services: docker-compose up
2. Init vault: ./_scripts/setup.sh
3. When done: docker-compose down
Subsequent Runs1. Start services: docker-compose up
2. Unseal vault: _scripts/unseal.sh
Backup1. Start services: docker-compose up
2. Run backup: _scripts/backup.sh
Remove all data1. Stop services: docker-compose down --volumes
2. Clear persisted data: _scripts/clean.sh

The complete setup described in this blog post can be found on Github: https://github.com/marco-lancini/docker_vault.

FAQs

Is Consul required for vault? ›

The Vault servers require both the Consul and Vault binaries on each node. Consul will be configured as a client agent and Vault will be configured as a server.

What is the difference between Vault and Consul? ›

The second category are open source tools that are highly configurable and can work with on-prem deployment. Vault which is a secret management solution and Consul is a popular storage backend which is fault-tolerant and highly scalable. Both Vault and Consul are offered by Hashicorp.

Can Consul and Docker swarm be used together? ›

With Consul is thus possible to run a Service Discovery service in Docker Swarm (albeit in "host" mode), that enables us to register the ATTX services via a HTTP API, and query the registered information as well.

What is Docker Consul? ›

Consul is a datacenter runtime that provides service discovery, configuration, and orchestration. docker pull consul.

Why do we need Consul? ›

Consul is a multi-networking tool that offers a fully-featured service mesh solution that solves the networking and security challenges of operating microservices and cloud infrastructure. Consul offers a software-driven approach to routing and segmentation.

Can I use HashiCorp vault for free? ›

HCP Vault simplifies cloud security automation on fully managed infrastructure. Get started for free, and pay only for what you use.

Is HashiCorp vault good? ›

Favorable Review

Vault by HashiCorp is really a good product for storing and retrieving secret data such as tokens, certificates and passwords. They provide good encryption standard for securing the data stored.

Is Consul A secure? ›

The Consul agent supports encrypting all of its network traffic. The exact method of encryption is described on the encryption security page. There are two separate encryption systems, one for gossip traffic and one for HTTP + RPC.

Does Consul do load balancing? ›

Consul has a built-in load balancing feature that allows services to communicate directly with one another. Consul also integrates with many popular load balancers such as NGINX, HAProxy, and F5, to automatically provide service updates, eliminating the need for manual processes.

Does Kubernetes use consul? ›

Consul can run directly on Kubernetes, so in addition to the native integrations provided by Consul itself, any other tool built for Kubernetes can choose to leverage Consul.

Does Kubernetes need Consul? ›

consul , i.e. you don't need Kubernetes Service objects created. Requires Consul DNS via CoreDNS in Kubernetes: This feature requires that Consul DNS is configured within Kubernetes.

Is consul a service mesh? ›

Consul is a service mesh solution that offers a software-driven approach to: Security (mTLS & ACLs) Observability. Traffic management.

Where is Consul used? ›

It is used by the service discovery components to route traffic away from unhealthy hosts. Key/Value Store − It can make use of Consul's hierarchical key/value store for any number of purposes, including dynamic configuration, feature flagging, coordination, leader election, etc.

Is Consul connect free? ›

HCP Consul simplifies cloud networking automation on either self-managed or fully managed infrastructure. Get started for free, and pay only for what you use.

What is a Consul command? ›

Consul is controlled via a very easy to use command-line interface (CLI). Consul is only a single command-line application: consul . This application then takes a subcommand such as "agent" or "members". The complete list of subcommands is in the navigation to the left.

What is a Consul in simple words? ›

: an official appointed by a government to reside in a foreign country in order to represent the commercial interests of citizens of the appointing country. Other Words from consul. consular \ -​sə-​lər \ adjective.

What is an example of a Consul? ›

The definition of a consul is a person who is appointed by a government to serve the citizens of that country in a foreign city. An example of a consul is a United States official helping American citizens in Istanbul.

How can I learn Consul? ›

Get Started on VMs
  1. What is Consul?
  2. Run the Consul Agent.
  3. Register a Service with Consul Service Discovery.
  4. Secure Service Communication with Consul Service Mesh and Envoy.
  5. Store Data in Consul KV.
  6. Explore the Consul UI.
  7. Create a Local Consul Datacenter.

Is HashiCorp vault expensive? ›

How much does HashiCorp Vault cost? The pricing for HashiCorp Vault starts at $0.03 per per hour. HashiCorp Vault has a single plan: Cloud at $0.03.

What is HashiCorp vault and consul? ›

Consul is a tool for service discovery and configuration. Consul is distributed, highly available, and extremely scalable. On the other hand, Vault is detailed as "Secure, store, and tightly control access to tokens, passwords, certificates, API keys, and other secrets in modern computing".

What is the difference between HashiCorp vault and CyberArk? ›

Hashicorp Vault is a known and proven solution used by leading banks and technology giants specifically for application-level secrets (Docker etc). CyberArk might be even a leader in managing enterprise secrets, but make sure it supports the scale of your microservices architecture.

Why is HashiCorp so popular? ›

With open-source tools like Terraform, Vault, Nomad and others, HashiCorp became one of the most valuable cloud infrastructure startups in recent years because its tools help big businesses build, deploy and managTe applications across multiple operating environments.

What companies use HashiCorp vault? ›

Who uses HashiCorp Vault?
CompanyWebsiteCountry
Dailymotion SAdailymotion.comFrance
Taos Mountain, Inc.taos.comUnited States
Red Hat Incredhat.comUnited States
Blackfriars Groupblackfriarsgroup.comUnited Kingdom

What problems does HashiCorp vault solve? ›

Why Vault?
  • Secure Secret Storage: Arbitrary key/value secrets can be stored in Vault. ...
  • Dynamic Secrets: Vault can generate secrets on-demand for some systems, such as AWS or SQL databases. ...
  • Data Encryption: Vault can encrypt and decrypt data without storing it.

Who uses Consul? ›

Who uses Consul? 272 companies reportedly use Consul in their tech stacks, including Robinhood, Slack, and LaunchDarkly.

How powerful is a Consul? ›

Consuls had extensive powers in peacetime (administrative, legislative, and judicial), and in wartime often held the highest military command. Additional religious duties included certain rites which, as a sign of their formal importance, could only be carried out by the highest state officials.

How many Consul servers are there? ›

A Consul cluster (typically three or five servers plus client agents) may be deployed in a single physical datacenter or it may span multiple datacenters. For a large cluster with high runtime reads and writes, deploying servers in the same physical location improves performance.

What if Consul server goes down? ›

If the failed server is recoverable, the best option is to bring it back online and have it rejoin the cluster with the same IP address. This will return the cluster to a fully healthy state. Similarly, if you need to rebuild a new Consul server, to replace the failed node, you may wish to do that immediately.

Where is Consul data stored? ›

The Consul KV datastore is located on the servers, but can be accessed by any agent (client or server). The natively integrated RPC functionality allows clients to forward requests to servers, including key/value reads and writes.

Is Consul a proxy? ›

Consul includes its own built-in L4 proxy and has first class support for Envoy. You can choose other proxies to plug in as well.

What port does Consul use? ›

It is off by default, but port 8502 is a convention used by various tools as the default. Defaults to 8502 in -dev mode.

What is the best monitoring tool for Kubernetes? ›

9 top open-source tools for monitoring Kubernetes
  1. Kubelet. In a Kubernetes cluster, Kubelet acts as a bridge between the master and the nodes. ...
  2. Container Advisor (cAdvisor) ...
  3. Kube-state-metrics. ...
  4. Kubernetes Dashboard. ...
  5. Prometheus. ...
  6. Jaeger. ...
  7. Kubewatch. ...
  8. Weave Scope.

Is Consul a key value store? ›

In addition to providing service discovery, integrated health checking, and securing network traffic, Consul includes a key value store, which you can use to dynamically configure applications, coordinate services, manage leader election, or serve as a data backend for Vault, along with a myriad of other uses.

Is Kubernetes a valuable skill? ›

Kubernetes skills are the most in demand for modern operational roles, such as devops and site reliability engineering (SRE) jobs. These are also the roles where the money is. In the United States, 95% of devops practitioners made more than $75,000 a year in salary in 2020, up from 93% in 2019.

What is the difference between Consul server and client? ›

The only difference between servers and clients are that servers are the only components that store and replicate data. Members of a Consul cluster automatically discover each other as long as they are given the address of at least one existing member.

Is Consul a gateway? ›

What is Consul API Gateway? Consul API Gateway is an add-on for Consul that helps users control access to services running within a Consul service mesh. The API gateway enables external network clients to access applications and services running in a Consul datacenter.

Is Consul a DNS server? ›

By default, the Consul agent runs a DNS server listening on port 8600. By submitting DNS requests to the Consul agent's DNS server, you can get the IP address of a node running the service in which you are interested. The Consul DNS interface makes the port information for a service available via the SRV records.

What is the difference between Istio and Consul? ›

Consul Connect uses an agent running on each node in a daemonset as the control plane, while Istio and Linkerd's Conduit use centralized services. For the data plane, all three mesh products use a “sidecar” pattern that places a proxy running in a separate container within each pod.

Does Consul use raft? ›

Raft in Consul

Only Consul server nodes participate in Raft and are part of the peer set. All client nodes forward requests to servers. Part of the reason for this design is that, as more members are added to the peer set, the size of the quorum also increases.

How do I enable Consul? ›

These setup steps should be completed on all Consul hosts.
  1. Install Consul.
  2. Verify the installation.
  3. Prepare the security credentials.
  4. Configure Consul agents.
  5. Server specific configuration.
  6. Client specific configuration.
  7. Apply Enterprise license.
  8. Configure the Consul process.

What is the difference between Consul and console? ›

It means an appointed person who acts as a representative of commercial or defense interests in a foreign land. [In history Rome and France also had consuls that performed other government duties.] Console has multiple meanings: As a verb, console (kuhn-soul) means to listen and comfort someone else who is hurting.

How does Consul work with Kubernetes? ›

Consul can also sync Kubernetes' native services into its own registry, which essentially gives us the ability to expand the service discovery scope and help connect more applications. We can also sync services outside of Kubernetes—and still manage it through that single pane of glass.

How do I register my consul vault? ›

2 Answers
  1. Create a file and write this {"service": {"name": "vault", "tags": ["vault-tag"], "port": 8200}} into it. Name it as vault.json.
  2. Now, enter this command consul services register vault.json.
  3. You can now see that vault is registered as a service.
11 Apr 2019

How long did a consul serve for? ›

Consuls were elected to office and held power for one year. There were always two consuls in power at any time.

What is consul backend? ›

The Consul storage backend is used to persist Vault's data in Consul's key-value store. In addition to providing durable storage, inclusion of this backend will also register Vault as a service in Consul with a default health check. High Availability – the Consul storage backend supports high availability.

What is agent in consul? ›

The Consul agent is the core process of Consul. The agent maintains membership information, registers services, runs checks, responds to queries, and more. The agent must run on every node that is part of a Consul cluster.

How does a consul template work? ›

When initiated, it reads one or more template files and queries Consul for all data needed to render them. Typically, you run consul-template as a daemon which will fetch the initial values and then continue to watch for updates, re-rendering the template whenever there are relevant changes in the datacenter.

How do I register my Consul vault? ›

2 Answers
  1. Create a file and write this {"service": {"name": "vault", "tags": ["vault-tag"], "port": 8200}} into it. Name it as vault.json.
  2. Now, enter this command consul services register vault.json.
  3. You can now see that vault is registered as a service.
11 Apr 2019

Why is there a Consul in Kubernetes? ›

Syncing Consul services to Kubernetes services enables non-Kubernetes services (such as external to the cluster) to be accessed in a native Kubernetes way: using kube-dns, environment variables, etc. This makes it very easy to automate external service discovery, including hosted services like databases.

How do you set up a Terraform vault? ›

Run Terraform to configure Vault
  1. Optional: Start a Vault server in development mode with root as the root token if you don't have one running already. ...
  2. Set the client token in the VAULT_TOKEN environment variable. ...
  3. Initialize Terraform to pull Vault provider plugin. ...
  4. Execute the apply command to configure Vault.

How does Vault work with Kubernetes? ›

Vault provides a Kubernetes authentication method that enables clients to authenticate with a Kubernetes Service Account Token. Enable the Kubernetes authentication method. Vault accepts this service token from any client within the Kubernetes cluster.

How do I backup my vault data? ›

Follow these steps to backup Vault using the Automated Snapshots feature (available only in Vault Enterprise).
  1. »Single Vault cluster.
  2. »Vault with Disaster Recovery Replication enabled.
  3. »Vault with Performance Replication enabled.

How do I install my vault license? ›

Assign Vault licenses
  1. Sign in to your Google Admin console. Sign in using your administrator account (does not end in @gmail.com).
  2. In the Admin console, go to Menu Billing. License settings.
  3. Click Google Vault.
  4. Click the Down arrow. and select On.
  5. Click Save.

Where do Consul stores store data? ›

The Consul KV datastore is located on the servers, but can be accessed by any agent (client or server). The natively integrated RPC functionality allows clients to forward requests to servers, including key/value reads and writes.

Is Consul A secure? ›

The Consul agent supports encrypting all of its network traffic. The exact method of encryption is described on the encryption security page. There are two separate encryption systems, one for gossip traffic and one for HTTP + RPC.

Does Consul do load balancing? ›

Consul has a built-in load balancing feature that allows services to communicate directly with one another. Consul also integrates with many popular load balancers such as NGINX, HAProxy, and F5, to automatically provide service updates, eliminating the need for manual processes.

What is the difference between Consul and console? ›

It means an appointed person who acts as a representative of commercial or defense interests in a foreign land. [In history Rome and France also had consuls that performed other government duties.] Console has multiple meanings: As a verb, console (kuhn-soul) means to listen and comfort someone else who is hurting.

How expensive is HashiCorp vault? ›

The pricing for HashiCorp Vault starts at $0.03 per per hour. HashiCorp Vault has a single plan: Cloud at $0.03.

How do I authenticate Terraform to vault? ›

Quick Start
  1. Enable the Terraform Cloud secrets engine: $ vault secrets enable terraform Success! ...
  2. Configure Vault to connect and authenticate to Terraform Cloud: $ vault write terraform/config \ token=Vhz7652ba4c-0f6e-8e75-5724-5e083d72cfe4 Success! ...
  3. Configure a role that maps a name in Vault to a Terraform Cloud User.

Is Terraform CI or CD? ›

Terraform by itself automates many tasks: it creates, changes, and versions your cloud resources. Although many teams run Terraform locally (sometimes with wrapper scripts), running Terraform in CI/CD can boost your organization's performance and ensure consistent deployments.

What is Docker vault? ›

Vault is a tool for securely accessing secrets. A secret is anything that you want to tightly control access to, such as API keys, passwords, certificates, and more. Vault provides a unified interface to any secret, while providing tight access control and recording a detailed audit log.

How does vault encrypt data? ›

Vault uses a security barrier for all requests made to the backend. The security barrier automatically encrypts all data leaving Vault using a 256-bit Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) cipher in the Galois Counter Mode (GCM) with 96-bit nonces. The nonce is randomly generated for every encrypted object.

How do I check my vault roles? ›

Roles are listed under Authentication Methods in Vault. You can view which authentication methods you have enabled (or enable new ones) by visiting the UI and clicking on the "Access" tab at the top.

Videos

1. The 4 Primary Vault Use Cases
(HashiCorp)
2. Deploying HCP Vault and Consul
(Ned in the Cloud)
3. Deploy a Production Ready Vault Cluster on AWS in 5 Minutes
(HashiCorp)
4. Vault for Secrets Management and TLS in Consul K8s – HashiConf Global 2021
(HashiCorp)
5. Zero Trust Security with Vault, Consul, and Boundary
(HashiCorp)
6. Demo: GitOps on Kubernetes with Consul, Vault & Terraform
(HashiCorp)

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