myperspectives Grade 8, PDF Free Download (2022)

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1 A Correlation of myperspectives Grade 8, To the English/Language Arts Grade 8

2 Introduction This document demonstrates how myperspectives English Language Arts meets the objectives of the. Correlation page references are to the Student Edition and Teacher s Edition and are cited by selection or feature title and page number. myperspectives English Language Arts is a learning environment that focuses on a connected approach to student learning. Students read texts and engage in activities that inspire thoughtful conversation, discussion, and debate. Students will encounter authors perspectives as they read literature from across time periods and cultures. Students will listen to the perspectives of their peers through conversations and collaborative activities. And, as students read the literature and engage in activities in myperspectives, they will formulate and defend their opinions as they develop their own perspectives. In each unit of study, students will read classic and contemporary fiction and nonfiction texts, and view/listen to media selections, all related to an Essential Question. Students will use technology to interact with texts and activities, and they can write directly in their Student Edition to make interaction with texts more meaningful. 2

3 Table of Contents READING... 4 READING: Nonfiction... 5 READING: Vocabulary... 7 WRITING... 9 SPEAKING AND LISTENING MEDIA LITERACY

4 Indiana Academic Standards GRADE 8 READING RL.1: LEARNING OUTCOME FOR READING LITERATURE Read and comprehend a variety of literature independently and proficiently 8.RL.1: Read a variety of literature within a range of complexity appropriate for grades 6-8. By the end of grade 8, students interact with texts proficiently and independently SE/TE: The Medicine Bag: 12; Hanging Fire/Translating Grandfather s House: 54; The Setting Sun and the Rolling World: 66; The Diary of Anne Frank, Act I: 100; The Diary of Anne Frank, Act II: 156; from Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence: 314; Flowers for Algernon: 350; Retort/The People, Yes/Unsuspecting: 416; Uncle Marcos: 448; from The Invention of Everything Else: 494; 25 Years Later, Hubble Sees Beyond a Troubled Start: 510 RL.2: KEY IDEAS AND TEXTUAL SUPPORT Build comprehension and appreciation of literature by analyzing, inferring, and drawing conclusions about literary elements, themes, and central ideas 8.RL.2.1: Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what a text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. SE/TE: The Diary of Anne Frank, Act I: 152; The Diary of Anne Frank, Act II: 188; Acceptance Speech for the Nobel Peace Prize: 226; from Flowers for Algernon: 387; Uncle Marcos: RL.2.2: Analyze the development of a theme or central idea over the course of a work of literature, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide a detailed summary that supports the analysis. 8.RL.2.3: Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a work of literature propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. 8.RL.2.4: Students are expected to build upon and continue applying concepts learned previously. SE/TE: The Setting Sun and the Rolling World: 73; Flowers for Algernon: 381; Small-Group Performance Task: 426 SE/TE: The Diary of Anne Frank, Act I: 153; The Diary of Anne Frank, Act II: 189; Uncle Marcos: 449 Students build upon and continue applying concepts learned previously. 4

5 RL.3: STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS AND ORGANIZATION Build comprehension and appreciation of literature, using knowledge of literary structure and point of view 8.RL.3.1: Compare and contrast the structure of two or more related works of literature (e.g., similar topic or theme), and analyze and evaluate how the differing structure of each text contributes to its meaning and style. SE/TE: Hanging Fire/Translating Grandfather s House: 63; from The Invention of Everything Else: RL.3.2: Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience in a work of world literature considering how it reflects heritage, traditions, attitudes, and beliefs. SE/TE: Flowers for Algernon: 381 RL.4: SYNTHESIS AND CONNECTION OF IDEAS Build comprehension and appreciation of literature by connecting various literary works and analyzing how medium and interpretation impact meaning 8.RL.4.1: Analyze the extent to which a filmed or live production of a story or play stays faithful to or departs from the text or script, evaluating the choices made by the director or actors. SE/TE: The Diary of Anne Frank, Act II: 192; from Flowers for Algernon: RL.4.2: Analyze how works of literature draw on and transform earlier texts. SE/TE: Flowers for Algernon: 381; Uncle Marcos: 449 READING: Nonfiction RN.1: LEARNING OUTCOME FOR READING NONFICTION Read and comprehend a variety of nonfiction independently and proficiently 8.RN.1: Read a variety of nonfiction within a range of complexity appropriate for grades 6-8. By the end of grade 8, students interact with texts proficiently and independently. SE/TE: You Are the Electric Boogaloo/Just Be Yourself: 44; Barrington Irving, Pilot and Educator: 264; Three Cheers for the Nanny State: 276; Soda Ban? What About Personal Choice?: 286; Words Do Not Pay: 306; from Blue Nines and Red Words: 400; The Theory of Multiple Intelligences Infographic: 412; To Fly: 464; Nikola Tesla: The Greatest Inventor of All?: 488 5

6 RN.2: KEY IDEAS AND TEXTUAL SUPPORT Extract and construct meaning from nonfiction texts using a range of comprehension skills 8.RN.2.1: Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what a text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. SE/TE: Barrington Irving, Pilot and Educator: 270; Words Do Not Pay: RN.2.2: Analyze the development of a central idea over the course of a text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide a detailed, objective summary of the text. 8.RN.2.3: Analyze how a text makes connections and distinctions among individuals, events, and ideas. SE/TE: Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl: 219; Three Cheers for the Nanny State: 283; Soda Ban? What About Personal Choice?: 291; Small-Group Performance Task: 426 SE/TE: Barrington Irving, Pilot and Educator: 270; Three Cheers for the Nanny State: 282; from Blue Nines and Red Words: 409; Small-Group Performance Task: 426; To Fly: 465; Nikola Tesla: The Greatest Inventor of All?: 492 RN.3: STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS AND ORGANIZATION Build understanding of nonfiction text, using knowledge of structural organization and author s purpose and message 8.RN.3.1: Students are expected to build upon and continue applying concepts learned previously. Students build upon and continue applying concepts learned previously. 8.RN.3.2: Analyze in detail the structure of a specific paragraph in a text, including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept. 8.RN.3.3: Determine an author s perspective or purpose in a text, and analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. SE/TE: Words Do Not Pay: 312; To Fly: 473; Nikola Tesla: The Greatest Inventor of All?: 491 SE/TE: Acceptance Speech for the Nobel Peace Prize: 227; Barrington Irving, Pilot and Educator: 274; Three Cheers for the Nanny State: 283; 25 Years Later, Hubble Sees Beyond a Troubled Start: 517 6

7 RN.4: SYNTHESIS AND CONNECTION OF IDEAS Build understanding of nonfiction texts by evaluating specific claims and synthesizing and connecting ideas 8.RN.4.1: Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; recognize when irrelevant evidence is introduced. SE/TE: Three Cheers for the Nanny State: 283; Soda Ban? What About Personal Choice?: RN.4.2: Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums (e.g., print or digital text, video, multimedia) to present a particular topic or idea. 8.RN.4.3: Analyze a case in which two or more texts provide conflicting information on the same topic and identify where the texts disagree on matters of fact or interpretation. SE/TE: Apache Girl s Rite of Passage: 33; Frank Family and World War II Timelines: 194, 200, 201; from Maus: 240 SE/TE: Soda Ban? What About Personal Choice?: 291, 294 READING: Vocabulary RV.1: LEARNING OUTCOME FOR READING VOCABULARY Acquire, refine, and apply vocabulary using various strategies and sources 8.RV.1: Acquire and use accurately gradeappropriate general academic and contentspecific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. SE/TE: Unit Opener: 5, 91, 257, 343, 441; from Maus: 230; The Moth Presents: Aleeza Kazmi: 324; from Flowers for Algernon: 384; The Theory of Multiple Intelligences Infographic: 412, 414; Nikola Tesla: The Greatest Inventor of All?: 488; Sounds of a Glass Armonica: 520, 522 RV.2: VOCABULARY BUILDING Build and refine vocabulary by using strategies to determine and clarify words and understand their relationships 8.RV.2.1: Use context to determine or clarify the meaning of words and phrases. SE/TE: The Medicine Bag: 24; You Are the Electric Boogaloo/Just Be Yourself: 44; Hanging Fire/Translating Grandfather s House: 54; Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl: 212; Words Do Not Pay: 306; 25 Years Later, Hubble Sees Beyond a Troubled Start: RV.2.2: Students are expected to build upon and continue applying concepts learned previously. Students build upon and continue applying concepts learned previously. 7

8 8.RV.2.3: Distinguish among the connotations of words with similar denotations. 8.RV.2.4: Use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., precede, recede, secede). 8.RV.2.5: Select appropriate general and specialized reference materials, both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, part of speech, or origin. SE/TE: Words Do Not Pay: 311; from The Invention of Everything Else: 494 SE/TE: The Setting Sun and the Rolling World: 72; The Diary of Anne Frank, Act I: 154; The Diary of Anne Frank, Act II: 190; Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl: 218; Barrington Irving, Pilot and Educator: 272; Three Cheers for the Nanny State: 284; Soda Ban? What About Personal Choice?: 292; from Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence: 320; Flowers for Algernon: 382; from Blue Nines and Red Words: 408; Uncle Marcos: 460; from The Invention of Everything Else: 505; 25 Years Later, Hubble Sees Beyond a Troubled Start: 516 SE/TE: The Medicine Bag: 24; You Are the Electric Boogaloo/Just Be Yourself: 50; Hanging Fire/Translating Grandfather s House: 62; Acceptance Speech for the Nobel Peace Prize: 222; from Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence: 314; Nikola Tesla: The Greatest Inventor of All?: 491; from The Invention of Everything Else: 505; 25 Years Later, Hubble Sees Beyond a Troubled Start: 510 RV.3: VOCABULARY IN LITERATURE AND NONFICTION TEXTS Build comprehension and appreciation of literature and nonfiction texts by determining or clarifying figurative, connotative, and technical meanings 8.RV.3.1: Analyze the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in works of literature, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. SE/TE: The Medicine Bag: 22; from Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence: 321; Retort/The People, Yes/Unsuspecting: ; from The Invention of Everything Else: RV.3.2: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a nonfiction text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. SE/TE: You Are the Electric Boogaloo/Just Be Yourself: 50 51; Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl: 220; from Maus: 240; Words Do Not Pay: 311; To Fly: 473; 25 Years Later, Hubble Sees Beyond a Troubled Start: 517 8

9 8.RV.3.3: Interpret figures of speech (e.g. verbal irony, puns) in context. SE/TE: Words Do Not Pay: 310; from The Invention of Everything Else: 506 WRITING W.1: LEARNING OUTCOME FOR WRITING Write effectively for a variety of tasks, purposes, and audiences 8.W.1: Write routinely over a variety of time frames for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences; apply reading standards to support analysis, reflection, and research by drawing evidence from literature and nonfiction texts. SE/TE: The Diary of Anne Frank, Act II: 192; Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl: 221; Soda Ban? What About Personal Choice?: 295; Whole-Group Performance Task: ; from Follow the Rabbit- Proof Fence: 323; from Flowers for Algernon: 389 W.2: HANDWRITING Demonstrate the ability to write legibly 8.W.2: Students are expected to build upon and continue applying concepts learned previously. Students build upon and continue applying concepts learned previously. W.3: WRITING GENRES: Develop and refine writing skills by writing for different purposes and to specific audiences or people ARGUMENTATIVE 8.W.3.1: Write arguments in a variety of forms that SE/TE: Barrington Irving, Pilot and Educator: 274; Soda Ban? What About Personal Choice?: 295; Whole-Class Performance Task: , ; Uncle Marcos: 462; To Fly: 476; from The Invention of Everything Else: 509 Introduce claim(s), acknowledge and distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and organize the reasons and evidence logically. Support claim(s) with logical reasoning and relevant evidence, using accurate, credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text. SE/TE: Soda Ban? What About Personal Choice?: 295; Whole-Class Performance Task: , ; Uncle Marcos: 462; To Fly: 476; from The Invention of Everything Else: 509 SE/TE: Barrington Irving, Pilot and Educator: 274; Soda Ban? What About Personal Choice?: 295; Whole-Class Performance Task: , ; Uncle Marcos: 462; To Fly: 476; from The Invention of Everything Else: 509 9

10 Use effective transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence. Establish and maintain a consistent style and tone appropriate to purpose and audience. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented. INFORMATIVE 8.W.3.2: Write informative compositions on a variety of topics that Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. Develop the topic with relevant, wellchosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples from various sources and texts. Use appropriate and varied transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts. SE/TE: Soda Ban? What About Personal Choice?: 295; Whole-Class Performance Task: , ; Uncle Marcos: 462; To Fly: 476; from The Invention of Everything Else: 509 SE/TE: Soda Ban? What About Personal Choice?: 295; Whole-Class Performance Task: , ; Uncle Marcos: 462; To Fly: 476; from The Invention of Everything Else: 509 SE/TE: Barrington Irving, Pilot and Educator: 274; Soda Ban? What About Personal Choice?: 295; Whole-Class Performance Task: , ; To Fly: 476; from The Invention of Everything Else: 509 SE/TE: Apache Girl s Rite of Passage: 33; The Setting Sun and the Rolling World: 74; Whole-Class Performance Task: , ; Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl: 221; Words Do Not Pay: 313; from Flowers for Algernon: 389; from Blue Nines and Red Words: 411 SE/TE: Frank Family and World War II Timelines: 201; Whole-Class Performance Task: , ; Words Do Not Pay: 313 SE/TE: The Setting Sun and the Rolling World: 74; The Diary of Anne Frank, Act II: 192; Frank Family and World War II Timelines: 201; Whole-Class Performance Task: , ; Words Do Not Pay: 313; from Flowers for Algernon: 389; from Blue Nines and Red Words: 411 SE/TE: Whole-Class Performance Task: , ; from Flowers for Algernon:

11 Choose language and context-specific vocabulary that express ideas precisely and concisely, recognizing and eliminating wordiness and redundancy. Establish and maintain a style appropriate to the purpose and audience. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented. NARRATIVE 8.W.3.3: Write narrative compositions in a variety of forms that Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters. Organize an event sequence (e.g., conflict, climax, resolution) that unfolds naturally and logically, using a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, and reflection, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events. Provide an ending that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events. SE/TE: Rites of Passage: 26, 34, 50, 62, 84; SE/TE: The Setting Sun and the Rolling World: 74; Whole-Class Performance Task: , ; from Blue Nines and Red Words: 411 SE/TE: The Setting Sun and the Rolling World: 74; Whole-Class Performance Task: , SE/TE: The Medicine Bag: 26; Whole-Class Performance Task: 34 38; from Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence: 323 SE/TE: The Medicine Bag: 26; Whole-Class Performance Task: 34 38; from Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence: 323 SE/TE: The Medicine Bag: 16, 33, 34 SE/TE: The Medicine Bag: 26; Whole-Class Performance Task: 34 38; from Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence: 323 SE/TE: The Medicine Bag: 26; Whole-Class Performance Task: SE/TE: The Medicine Bag: 26; Whole-Class Performance Task:

12 W.4: THE WRITING PROCESS Produce coherent and legible documents by planning, drafting, revising, editing, and collaborating with others 8.W.4: Apply the writing process to SE/TE: Whole-Class Performance Task: 39, 207, 301, 395 Plan and develop; draft; revise using appropriate reference materials; rewrite; try a new approach; and edit to produce and strengthen writing that is clear and coherent, with some guidance and support from peers and adults. Use technology to interact and collaborate with others to generate, produce, and publish writing and present information and ideas efficiently. SE/TE: Whole-Class Performance Task: 39, 207, 301, 395 SE/TE: Whole-Group Performance Task: 301; from The Invention of Everything Else: 509 W.5: THE RESEARCH PROCESS Build knowledge about the research process and the topic under study by conducting research FINDING, ASSESSING, SYNTHESIZING, AND REPORTING INFORMATION 8.W.5: Conduct short research assignments and tasks to build knowledge about the research process and the topic under study. SE/TE: You Are the Electric Boogaloo/Just Be Yourself: 53; Words Do Not Pay: 313; from Blue Nines and Red Words: 411; Sounds of a Glass Armonica: 523 Formulate a research question. Gather relevant information from multiple sources, using search terms effectively, and annotate sources. Assess the credibility and accuracy of each source. Quote or paraphrase the information and conclusions of others. Avoid plagiarism and follow a standard format for citation. SE/TE: The Medicine Bag: 21, The Diary of Anne Frank, Act 1: 151 SE/TE: The Setting Sun and the Rolling World: 74; Words Do Not Pay: 313; from Blue Nines and Red Words: 411; Sounds of a Glass Armonica: 523 SE/TE: Words Do Not Pay: 313; from Blue Nines and Red Words: 411; Sounds of a Glass Armonica: 523 SE/TE: Words Do Not Pay: 313; from Blue Nines and Red Words: 411; Sounds of a Glass Armonica: 523 SE/TE: Words Do Not Pay: 313; from Blue Nines and Red Words: 411; Sounds of a Glass Armonica:

13 Present information, choosing from a variety of formats. SE/TE: Words Do Not Pay: 313; from Blue Nines and Red Words: 411; Sounds of a Glass Armonica: 523 W.6: CONVENTIONS OF STANDARD ENGLISH Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English GRAMMAR AND USAGE 8.W.6.1: Demonstrate command of English grammar and usage, focusing on: SE/TE: The Diary of Anne Frank, Act I: 155; The Diary of Anne Frank, Act II: 191; Whole-Class Performance Task: 205, 299; Acceptance Speech for the Nobel Peace Prize: 228; Barrington Irving, Pilot and Educator: 272; Three Cheers for the Nanny State: 285; Soda Ban? What About Personal Choice?: 293; from Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence: 322; Flowers for Algernon: 383; Whole-Class Performance Task: 393; from Blue Nines and Red Words: 410; Uncle Marcos: 461; Nikola Tesla: The Greatest Inventor of All?: 493; from The Invention of Everything Else: W.6.1a: Pronouns Students are expected to build upon and continue applying conventions learned previously. 8.W.6.1b: Verbs Explaining the function of verbals (gerunds, participles, infinitives) in general and their function in particular sentences; forming and using active and passive voice; recognizing and correcting inappropriate shifts in verb voice. 8.W.6.1c: Adjectives and Adverbs Students are expected to build upon and continue applying conventions learned previously. 8.W.6.1d: Phrases and Clauses Students are expected to build upon and continue applying conventions learned previously. SE/TE: Students build upon and continue applying conventions learned previously. For example, see: Small Group Learning: 44C, 45; Whole Class Learning: 266; Barrington Irving, Pilot and Educator 273 SE/TE: The Medicine Bag: 25; You Are the Electric Boogaloo/Just Be Yourself: 52; Retort/The People, Yes/Unsuspecting: 424; Whole-Class Performance Task: 393, 481 SE/TE: Students build upon and continue applying conventions learned previously. For example, see; from Follow the Rabbit- Proof Fence: 378 SE/TE: Students build upon and continue applying conventions learned previously. For example, see: Language Development: 424; Performance Task: Write an Explanatory Essay: 205; Three Cheers for the Nanny State:

14 8.W.6.1e: Usage Students are expected to build upon and continue applying conventions learned previously. SE/TE: Students build upon and continue applying conventions learned previously. For example, see: Performance Task: Write an Argument: 301; Unit Introduction: 343; Performance Task: Write an Informative Speech: 395 CAPITALIZATION, PUNCTUATION, AND SPELLING 8.W.6.2: Demonstrate command of the SE/TE: Whole-Class Performance Task: conventions of standard English 205; Three Cheers for the Nanny State: capitalization, punctuation, and spelling 285; To Fly: 475 focusing on: 8.W.6.2a: Capitalization Students are expected to build upon and continue applying conventions learned previously. 8.W.6.2b: Punctuation Using punctuation (comma, ellipsis, dash) to indicate a pause, break, or omission. 8.W.6.2c: Spelling Students are expected to build upon and continue applying conventions learned previously. SE/TE: Students build upon and continue applying conventions learned previously. For example see: To Fly 475 SE/TE: Nikola Tesla: The Greatest Inventor of All?: 493; 25 Years Later, Hubble Sees Beyond a Troubled Start: 518 SE/TE: Barrington Irving, Pilot and Educator: 272; Whole-Class Performance Task: 299, 395, 481; To Fly:

15 SPEAKING AND LISTENING SL.1: LEARNING OUTCOME FOR SPEAKING AND LISTENING Refine and apply effective communication skills through speaking and active listening 8.SL.1: Listen actively and adjust the use of spoken language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes. SE/TE: Small-Group Performance Task: 77, 243, 427 SL.2: DISCUSSION AND COLLABORATION Refine and apply reciprocal communication skills by participating in a range of collaborative discussions 8.SL.2.1: Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) on gradeappropriate topics, texts, and issues, building on others ideas and expressing personal ideas clearly. SE/TE: Hanging Fire/Translating Grandfather s House: 65; Share Your Independent Learning: 82, 248, 334, 432, 530; Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl: 219; Acceptance Speech for the Nobel Peace Prize: 226, 229; from Maus: ; Barrington Irving, Pilot and Educator: 275; The Moth Presents: Aleeza Kazmi: 327; The Theory of Multiple Intelligences Infographic: 415; Retort/The People, Yes/Unsuspecting: 425; Uncle Marcos: 463; To Fly: 477; 25 Years Later, Hubble Sees Beyond a Troubled Start: 519; Small-Group Performance Task: SL.2.2: Examine, analyze, and reflect on ideas under discussion by identifying specific evidence from materials under study and other resources. SE/TE: Hanging Fire/Translating Grandfather s House: 65; The Diary of Anne Frank, Act II: 193; Frank Family and World War II Timelines: 200; Acceptance Speech for the Nobel Peace Prize: 229; The Moth Presents: Aleeza Kazmi: 327; from Flowers for Algernon: 388; The Theory of Multiple Intelligences Infographic: 415; Retort/The People, Yes/Unsuspecting: 425; Uncle Marcos: 463; 25 Years Later, Hubble Sees Beyond a Troubled Start: 519; Small-Group Performance Task:

16 8.SL.2.3: Follow rules for considerate discussions and decision-making, track progress toward specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed. 8.SL.2.4: Pose questions that connect the ideas of several speakers and respond to others questions and comments with relevant evidence, observations, and ideas. 8.SL.2.5: Acknowledge new information expressed by others, and, when warranted, qualify or justify personal views in reference to the evidence presented. SE/TE: Hanging Fire/Translating Grandfather s House: 65; Acceptance Speech for the Nobel Peace Prize: 229; The Moth Presents: Aleeza Kazmi: 327; The Theory of Multiple Intelligences Infographic: 415; Retort/The People, Yes/Unsuspecting: 425; Small-Group Performance Task: 426; Uncle Marcos: 463; 25 Years Later, Hubble Sees Beyond a Troubled Start: 519; Small- Group Performance Task: 525 SE/TE: Hanging Fire/Translating Grandfather s House: 65; Frank Family and World War II Timelines: 200; Acceptance Speech for the Nobel Peace Prize: 229; The Moth Presents: Aleeza Kazmi: 327; The Theory of Multiple Intelligences Infographic: 415; Small-Group Performance Task: 426; Uncle Marcos: 463; 25 Years Later, Hubble Sees Beyond a Troubled Start: 519 SE/TE: Hanging Fire/Translating Grandfather s House: 65; Acceptance Speech for the Nobel Peace Prize: 229; The Moth Presents: Aleeza Kazmi: 327; from Flowers for Algernon: 388; The Theory of Multiple Intelligences Infographic: 415; Small-Group Performance Task: 426; 25 Years Later, Hubble Sees Beyond a Troubled Start: 519; Small-Group Performance Task: 525 SL.3: COMPREHENSION Refine and apply active listening and interpretation skills using various strategies 8.SL.3.1: Analyze the purpose of information presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and evaluate the motives (e.g., social, commercial, political) behind its presentation. SE/TE: Apache Girl s Rite of Passage: 32; Small-Group Performance Task: SL.3.2: Delineate a speaker s argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and relevance and sufficiency of the evidence and identifying when irrelevant evidence is introduced. SE/TE: Barrington Irving, Pilot and Educator: 275; Small-Group Performance Task: 329, 525; To Fly: 477; 25 Years Later, Hubble Sees Beyond a Troubled Start:

17 SL.4: PRESENTATION OF KNOWLEDGE AND IDEAS Refine and apply speaking skills to communicate ideas effectively in a variety of situations 8.SL.4.1: Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with relevant evidence, sound valid reasoning, and well-chosen details; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation. SE/TE: The Medicine Bag: 27; Apache Girl s Rite of Passage: 32; You Are the Electric Boogaloo/Just Be Yourself: 53; Small-Group Performance Task: 76 77, 329, 427, ; Reflect on the Unit: 87, 253, 339, 437, 535; The Diary of Anne Frank, Act II: 193; from Maus: 241; Small- Group Performance Task: 243; Barrington Irving, Pilot and Educator: 275; Soda Ban? What About Personal Choice?: 295; Retort/The People, Yes/Unsuspecting: 425; To Fly: 477; Sounds of a Glass Armonica: SL.4.2: Create engaging presentations that integrate multimedia components and visual displays to clarify information, strengthen claims and evidence, and add interest. 8.SL.4.3: Students are expected to build upon and continue applying concepts learned previously. SE/TE: You Are the Electric Boogaloo/Just Be Yourself: 53; Small-Group Performance Task: 76 77, 243, 329, 427; Reflect on the Unit: 87; from Maus: 241; Retort/The People, Yes/Unsuspecting: 425; Sounds of a Glass Armonica: 523 Students build upon and continue applying concepts learned previously. MEDIA LITERACY ML.1: LEARNING OUTCOME FOR MEDIA LITERACY Develop and enhance understanding of the roles of media and techniques and strategies used to achieve various purposes 8.ML.1: Critically analyze information found in electronic, print, and mass media used to inform, persuade, entertain, and transmit culture. SE/TE: Apache Girl s Rite of Passage: 28, 31 ML.2: MEDIA LITERACY Analyze the purposes of media and the ways in which media can have influences 8.ML.2.1: Identify and analyze persuasive SE/TE: Words Do Not Pay: 311 and propaganda techniques used in visual and verbal messages by electronic, print and mass media, and identify false or misleading information. 8.ML.2.2: Analyze and interpret how people experience media messages differently, depending on point of view, culture, etc. SE/TE: Frank Family and World War II Timelines: 199; from Maus: 230; The Moth Presents: Aleeza Kazmi:

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